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Smash. Boom. Crash.

Electronics Contract Manufacturers Face Supply-Chain Pileup -- Component shortages have led to a "traffic pileup" in the global electronics supply chain, with major contract manufacturers facing a challenging supply imbalance, according to iSuppli Corp. The research firm said the imbalance was characterized by tight inventories of parts and finished products and a glut of raw materials. A quick snapshot of inventory at five of the larger electronic manufacturing service, or EMS, providers showed that components and raw materials accounted for nearly 70% of total inventories during the first quarter of the year, according to iSuppli. In comparison, work-in-progress goods made up about 17% of inventories, while finished goods comprised less than 15%, industry analysis from iSuppli shows. The first quarter is the latest for which data are available.

Cloud stuff.

Getting ahead in the clouds -- Traditionally, ERP systems are within the four walls of a company, meaning that integration across enterprise boundaries is restricted.Increasing supply chain complexity is a major concern for just about every sector across the broad industrial spectrum. According to a worldwide study of small and medium-sized enterprises in the discrete manufacturing industry - just published by IDC Manufacturing Insights and conducted on behalf of Infor and IBM - some 58.9 per cent of Western and North American respondents stated that complexity is a critical issue regardless of the size of the business.

Gross.

Flies, Birds, Mice Found at Egg Plant -- Inspectors found mice, wild birds, flies, overflowing manure and other serious violations at facilities owned by a company at the center of the nationwide egg recall, the Food and Drug Administration said Monday. Wright County Egg Co., in Iowa, one of the nation's largest egg producers, had "significant objectionable conditions" at some of its plants, including "live and dead flies too numerous to count," the agency said in a formal notice to the company.

Sick of the job market here in the states? China is hiring.

China Asks C.E.O.'s to Work for State -- The Chinese government ran an enormous help-wanted advertisement on Monday seeking professional managers for some of its biggest state-controlled companies, a novel but not unprecedented move that apparently reflected unhappiness with the companies' current performance.

Sheena Moore

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