Spend Matters Friday Latte

Not ok.
Who's Picking Your Berries? Feds Find Young Children on Strawberry Farms -- Nearly two years after ABC News cameras uncovered young children toiling away in Michigan's blueberry fields, federal investigators have found yet another disturbing example of illegal use of child labor in the berry industry. Three southwest Washington strawberry growers were fined $73,000 last week after the U.S. Department of Labor found children between the ages of six and 11 working in their strawberries fields in June.

Wait, there are more.
Chinese authorities find 22 fake Apple stores -- A total of 22 fake Apple stores have been uncovered in one Chinese city. Authorities in Kunming began searching out the copycats after pictures of one convincing replica were circulated on the web. An early search found five fake stores, two of which were shut down for trading without a licence. Now, according to Chinese trade officials, 22 have been found unlawfully using Apple's brand and logo.

USPS continues cutting costs. And jobs.
Postal Service May Cut 120,000 Jobs -- Facing a second year of losses totaling $8 billion or more, the agency also wants to pull its workers out of the retirement and health benefits plans covering federal workers and set up its own benefit systems. Congressional approval would be needed for either step, and both could be expected to face severe opposition from postal unions which have contracts that ban layoffs. The post office has cut 110,000 jobs over the last four years and is currently engaged in eliminating 7,500 administrative staff. In its 2010 annual report, the agency said it had 583,908 career employees.

No more short sales!
Four European Nations to Curtail Short-Selling -- A European market regulator announced Thursday night that short-selling of stocks in several countries would be temporarily banned in an effort to stop the tailspin in the markets. The move may put pressure on United States market regulators to ban short sales as well. American bank stocks have been volatile all week as global investors expressed concerns that problems in Europe might cross the ocean.

- Sheena Moore

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