Spend Matters Afternoon Coffee

Radioactive Traces Found in Japan Baby Formula -- In the latest radiation food scare to hit Japan, the country's largest maker of baby formula said it found radioactive cesium in cans on store shelves. Although the measured amount falls well below the level the government has declared hazardous, the discovery lengthens the list of foods affected by the nuclear accident, and is the first in a product targeted at the age group considered most vulnerable to the effects of radioactivity.

Where do you work/live/operate?
America's Most and Least Disaster-Ready Cities -- The U.S. Center for Disease Control launched the "Cities Readiness Initiative" (CRI) to enhance the emergency preparedness of America's largest cities and metropolitan statistical areas, which encompasses more than 50% of the nation's population. In particular, the CRI considers the capabilities of public-health departments in large metropolitan areas to manage the mother of all crises – a mega-scale bio-terrorism attack. By contemplating an extreme scenario, the CRI considers the full gamut of response capabilities considered critical to managing a crisis.

The effects of austerity.
In Ireland, Austerity Is Praised but Painful -- Having embraced severe belt-tightening to mend its tattered finances, Ireland is showing glimmers of a turnaround. A year after it received a 67.5 billion euro bailout, or about $90 billion at current exchange rates, modest growth has returned and the budget deficit is shrinking. But the effects of austerity have pummeled Ireland's fragile economy, leaving scars that are likely to take years to heal. Nearly 40,000 Irish have fled the country this year alone in search of a brighter future elsewhere; the trend is expected to continue.

Company failing? Make everything WAY less convenient.
U.S. Postal Service Faces Bankruptcy, Plans Cuts To Slow Delivery Of First Class Mail -- Facing bankruptcy, the U.S. Postal Service is pushing ahead with unprecedented cuts to first-class mail next spring that will slow delivery and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. The estimated $3 billion in reductions, to be announced in broader detail on Monday, are part of a wide-ranging effort by the cash-strapped Postal Service to quickly trim costs, seeing no immediate help from Congress.

Sheena Moore

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