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Commodity Edge: Sourcing Intelligence for the New Normal
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Diet fads cause commodity shortages...and clogged arteries...
Diet craze leaves Norwegians starved of butter -- The soaring popularity of a fat-rich fad diet has depleted stocks of butter in Norway creating a looming Christmas culinary crisis. Norwegians have eaten up the country's entire stockpile of butter, partly as the result of a "low-carb" diet sweeping the Nordic nation which emphasizes a higher intake of fats. "Sales all of a sudden just soared, 20 percent in October then 30 percent in November," said Lars Galtung, the head of communications at TINE, the country's biggest farmer-owned cooperative.

Look out, West Coast.
Occupy Wall Street looks to block West Coast ports -- Anti-Wall Street protesters, hoping to briefly cripple a key supply chain of American commerce and re-energize their movement, plan to attempt to block major West Coast ports on Monday. By marching on U.S. ports from California to Alaska, organizers look to call attention to economic inequalities in the country and a financial system they complain is unfairly tilted toward the wealthy.

Keep your bags on your person...
In Bags at J.F.K., Handlers Found Niche for Crime -- When federal investigators announced they had broken up a cocaine-trafficking ring, the crime boss was not a member of a Mexican cartel or the Mafia. The ringleader was Victor Bourne, a low-wage baggage handler for American Airlines at Kennedy International Airport. And his associates in the enterprise were other airline employees: baggage handlers and crew chiefs who delivered contraband while they delivered luggage to the baggage-claim area.

Cyber risk.
Cyber attacks could wreck world oil supply -- Hackers are bombarding the world's computer controlled energy sector, conducting industrial espionage and threatening potential global havoc through oil supply disruption. Oil company executives warned that attacks were becoming more frequent and more carefully planned. "If anybody gets into the area where you can control opening and closing of valves, or release valves, you can imagine what happens," said Ludolf Luehmann, an IT manager at Shell (RDSa.L) Europe's biggest company.

Sheena Moore

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