Spend Matters Afternoon Coffee

Some big changes for HP.
H-P Appoints Chief Operating Officer -- Hewlett-Packard Co. HPQ -1.32% has named Bill Veghte, who recently led the company's software business, to fill the newly created position of chief operating officer. George Kadifa, recently an executive at technology investment firm Silver Lake, will take over Mr. Veghte's role at HP Software as the company looks to rework its software offerings. The changes in the executive management team come shortly after H-P unveiled plans to lay off 27,000 employees--about 9% of its workforce--amid sliding profits. It plans to use the savings to boost investment in cloud, big data and security. The company, which is the world's largest computer maker by volume, said sales in its PC business were relatively flat and its printing business sales were also slow in the fiscal second quarter. Chief Executive Meg Whitman said last week that the results appeared to be stabilizing.

"Making the invisible visible."
Arup: calculating emissions in the supply chain – a world first -- A collaboration between a university and an international firm of engineers, planners and designers has delivered a world first – a tool to help calculate emissions in everything universities buy. More than a third of all emissions from universities and higher education institutions come from the supply chain but, historically, the carbon generated by a professor's desk has been much more difficult to calculate than the electricity a desk light uses. In a pioneering project, Arup linked up with De Montfort University's Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development to produce the HEI calculation tool. It helps institutions set targets to reduce supply chain emissions by enabling them to calculate and report them – making "the invisible visible". All institutions have been given a 2013 deadline to measure these emissions.

FDA granted the right to charge generic suppliers an "inspection fee."
FDA's new User Fee Bill spurs hopes for safer overseas supply chain -- A collaboration between a university and an international firm of engineers, planners and designers has delivered a world first – a tool to help calculate emissions in everything universities buy. More than a third of all emissions from universities and higher education institutions come from the supply chain but, historically, the carbon generated by a professor's desk has been much more difficult to calculate than the electricity a desk light uses. In a pioneering project, Arup linked up with De Montfort University's Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development to produce the HEI calculation tool. It helps institutions set targets to reduce supply chain emissions by enabling them to calculate and report them – making "the invisible visible". All institutions have been given a 2013 deadline to measure these emissions.

Now we just drive computers all day.
The Death Of Shop Class And America's Skilled Workforce -- Shop classes are being eliminated from California schools due to the University of California/California State 'a-g' requirements. 'The intent of the 'a-g' subject requirements is to ensure that students can participate fully in the first-year program at the University in a wide variety of fields of study.' (a) History/Social Science (b) English © Mathematics (d) Laboratory Science (e) Language other than English (f) Visual and Performing Arts (g) College Preparatory Elective Courses. High school administrators are graded on their effectiveness to administer those classes through the Western Association of Schools and Colleges accreditation. Shop class is not included in the requirements, thereby not valued and schools consider the class a burden to support. Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) with 660,000 students in K-12 has already eliminated 90% of shop classes and it looks like the rest will be gone by the end of the 2013.

- Sheena Moore

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