Supplier Webinar, Market Intelligence Search, Procurement Influence, Dreamliner Woes Continue

- February 4, 2013 12:32 PM
Categories: Industry News | Tags: ,

Did you miss our webinar with Coupa and Dell last week?

Click to watch the recorded event: 3 Ways to Earn Loyalty and Profit from Your Suppliers: Lessons from Dell

Everyone’s going Google.

Thomson Reuters Brings Google-Like Search To Market Information — Looking up Cisco results on a Thomson Reuters Eikon terminal is as simple as typing in Cis. The name will autofill and you’re there.  Just like Google. Is nowhere safe from the consumerization of IT, not even trading rooms? “We want to change the way people interact with financial information,” said Philip Brittan, global head of desktop platform at Thomson Reuters. “We are making it more like what modern search engines, such as Google, have done in the way you search the Web and interact with Web sites putting the search bar front and center allowing users to simply input what they are looking for.

Suck it up, procurement.

It’s time for procurement to quit being the victim — Although it’s difficult to argue with any of the good advice on stakeholder engagement from the various contributors, I was disheartened by the apologetic tone of some in the profession who lament the limitations on procurement influence within their organisations. I can’t remember the last time I heard someone from finance declaring it needed to go out and convince other parts of the business how it can add value. Or when I last saw someone from marketing spitting blood in the corridor at how the business just “didn’t get it”.

“Cheap, plastic, and prone to failure.”

Boeing 787’s problems blamed on outsourcing, lack of oversight — Company engineers blame the 787’s outsourced supply chain, saying that poor quality components are coming from subcontractors that have operated largely out of Boeing’s view. “The risk to the company is not this battery, even though this is really bad right now,” said one 787 electrical engineer, who asked not to be identified. “The real problem is the power panels.”

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