Spend Matters’ Andrew Karpie Speaks to Forbes on Transformation of the Workplace

services procurement

Spend Matters’ own Andrew Karpie was recently interviewed for a Forbes Q&A article titled “The Workplace Will Be Radically Different By 2025, Are You Ready?” Published Nov. 30, Forbes contributor Elaine Pofeldt asked Andrew about the rise of online talent platforms and how they are changing the labor market and workplace by creating new ways of conducting and managing work. Head on over to Forbes for the full interview, but here is one snippet:

“We are going from a place where work arrangements established between workers, businesses and consumers were barely intermediated by technology to one where technology supports the intermediation, often 100% with end-to-end-platforms like Upwork and Uber,” Andrew told Forbes. “In other words, technology is more and more the 'digital middleman in the cloud' that can reshape and expand how work can be arranged and structured.”

Contingent workforce has been a major area of interest here at Spend Matters. The use of freelancers and the growing number of digital platforms available today to manage these independent contract workers is something we have talked a lot about in the last nine to 12 months. But the rise of the “gig economy” and what Andrew calls “work intermediation platforms” (WIPs) has caught the attention of mainstream business media, perhaps showing how prevalent these topics are becoming in the business world.

There are currently an estimated 53 million freelancers in the U.S., according to the recent Upwork and Freelancers Union’s “Freelancing in America: 2015” report. As this number rises, Andrew told Forbes, the workplace as we know it today will be “completely transformed.” Companies will have to get used to engaging with and managing multiple types of work arrangements, Andrew said.

In the last year alone, there have been numerous new platforms released to help businesses, which you can read about below. No doubt, this space will continue to grow and remain a hot topic on Spend Matters and perhaps more widespread publications in the future.

Discuss this:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *