Author Archives: Richard Lee



Intermittent Fasting: Procurement and Supply Chain Lessons From Weight Lifting Supplements (Part 6)

procurement lessons

OK, we admit that the last item in this series comparing both dangerous and supposedly safe weight lifting supplements to procurement and supply chain strategies is not a supplement at all. Rather, this final tip is a modified approach to, well, eating. And if you practice it, people will think you’re crazy. But trust us (Jason, specifically) — it works. What’s the “supplement” you ask? Intermittent fasting tied to workouts.

BCCAs: Procurement and Supply Chain Lessons From Weight Lifting Supplements (Part 5)

procurement and supply chain lessons

As we continue our series on ways to “pump” procurement and supply chain based on lessons learned from weight lifting substances, we come to a rather pedestrian ingredient in many higher-end protein and other supplements today: branched-chain amino acids (BCAA ). Incidentally, if you missed the previous installments in the series, be sure to see them in all their ripped glory: introduction, Ultimate Orange, diuretic pills and Creatine.

Creatine: Procurement and Supply Chain Lessons From Weight Lifting Supplements (Part 4)

Procurement

As we continue our series comparing weight lifting supplements to procurement and supply chain strategies, we take a happier turn from our last installment on diuretic pills. (See also the previous introductory and Ultimate Orange posts on the topic.) Today we come to creatine, a weight lifting supplement Richard succinctly describes as a miracle: “this stuff is absolutely G-D-sent.” Richard equates a scoop of creatine with a good, 12 ounce steak — with all of the benefits of pure protein extract without the downside, such as fat or cholesterol.

Diuretic Pills: Procurement and Supply Chain Lessons From Weight Lifting Supplements (Part 3)

procurement

In the spirit of Santa’s fast approaching all-night ride and the training he must endure before setting out on the round the world trek — it’s amazing he was able to do it before supplements — we continue our series of comparing weight lifting supplements to procurement and supply chain strategies. If you’re just finding this write-up now, please see our introductory and Ultimate Orange installments from earlier in the month. Today, we cut right to the chase — or rather, cut the excess liquid in our bodies as we come to our next supplement, diuretic pills.

Ultimate Orange: Procurement and Supply Chain Lessons From Weight Lifting Supplements (Part 2)

procurement

Some people say weightlifting is not the sport for intellectuals. We’ve also heard the same thing said of procurement, mind you. But anyone who would dismiss either in such a manner has clearly not done their homework, or clearly has a chip on their shoulder. (Their atrophied, miniscule deltoids, that is.) External criticisms aside, there are more commonalities between the activity and the profession than not. This includes how to “juice” performance at the expense of longer-term horizons.

Procurement and Supply Chain Lessons From Weight Lifting Supplements

procurement supplememnts

I must admit I’m the accidental lifter. At almost 6 feet tall and roughly 165 pounds, I’m better suited to running moderately fast and evangelizing the virtues of a mostly vegan diet than benching or deadlifts. I don't really look the part either. But regardless of personal appearances, I’ve got a newfound hobby. And one conversation with a friend got me thinking: It turns out old school weight supplements like Ultimate Orange are a lot like many of the shortcuts that procurement organizations use to “juice” their results.

Rant: On Corporate Inversion

AbbVie's $55-billion bid for UK drug maker Shire was approved, providing yet another footnote in the history of corporate inversion on the part of US companies mainly looking to avoid corporate taxes. The combined firm will move to UK, saving upwards of $8 billion in US corporate taxes by some estimates. While such a move certainly rubs policy makers the wrong way, in reality isn't this a perfect case study in the free market economy?

What Really Drives Valuation For Technology Companies These Days?

We’ve always found the subject of valuation for technology companies a curious topic, one that we could probably bore too many people with during cocktail hour conversations. Last fall, we wrote about the topic of valuation in the Spend Matters PRO brief Procurement Vendor Valuation, M&A, and IPOs: Recent Deals and 2014 Forecast, touching on many of the elements in valuation play right now. But this analysis says little for the fact that we appear to have a market at the current time that is bifurcated between certain vendors (e.g., Fieldglass) worth 8-12X topline revenue (or higher in the case of certain private investment rounds) and those like Intesource and Iasta which are going for less than two times their topline. In today’s Spend Matters PRO research brief, Group Managing Director Jason Busch and Spend Matters Group Managing Richard Lee offer up a perspective on what elements appear to be driving valuation and multiples in this market beyond the basics of SaaS and related valuation drivers in the procurement, supply chain, and finance areas.