Author Archives: Simon Jaehnig



Driving Sustainability and Compliance (Part 3): Managing Multi-Tier Risk and Opportunity

sustainability

This post is the last in a three-part series. Click here to read part 1 and part 2.

The process of launching IntegrityNext gave our team an amazing opportunity to connect with supply chain sustainability and compliance managers worldwide. We heard about challenges and targets as well as priorities for today and concerns about tomorrow. Regardless of industry or company size, professionals have immediately engaged, driven by their desire to improve the working and living conditions of supplier organizations and the communities they are based in. One of the questions that we heard most often was about multi-tier supplier sustainability and compliance: what does this mean and why is it important?

Driving Sustainability and Compliance (Part 2): The Power of Social Media Voices in the Supply Chain

LinkedIn ProFinder

This post is the second in a three-part series. Click here to read Part 1.

Social media gives voice to anyone looking for a platform: consumers and corporates, individuals and organizations. By enabling the democratization of instant worldwide communications, services such as Facebook and Twitter have created an overwhelming volume of unstructured data in a short period of time. While the development of social media voices is dynamic and continues to evolve without pause, businesses have yet to tap into its true power. What happens to these spontaneously created bits of data? Who is listening? Is there actionable value in the voices?

Driving Sustainability and Compliance (Part 1): Disrupting the Paradigm of the ‘Empty App’

As Pierre Mitchell pointed out in an article earlier this year, the vast majority of procurement technology is focused on the capture and containment of information. Supplier information. Product specifications and prices. Spend and transaction details. These are critical categories of information, but they don’t create value or achieve business objectives on their own. For that, procurement needs something more contextualized to its own company’s situation and designed to motivate action.