The Commodity Risk Management Category

Cobalt and the Sustainability of Electric Vehicles

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Nick Peksa, opportunities director at Mintec.

Recently I have been reading a number of case studies based on some of the world’s leading sustainable and socially responsible firms, ranging from Unilever’s work in Brazil and Danone’s work in India to Vodafone and their mobile payment systems in Kenya. One of the other favorite firms for academic research is Tesla, with its “greener than thou” philosophy. Delving a little deeper into the mechanics of batteries, however, the word “cobalt” rang a number of alarm bells.

Commodity Price Volatility in the Cannabis Supply Chain: The Biggest Growing Pain?

As I write this on the eve of participating in a conference panel discussion about how corporate communications can better work with trade media firms, I can’t help but think about my relationship with the legal cannabis industry — and particularly its supply chain. Sounds like a stretch, right? Not so much.

Commodity Price Risk Management: For the Many, Not the Few

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Tom Lawrence, director at Flow&Ebb. 

Commodity markets affect us all. Wild swings in commodity prices affect how much we pay for groceries, how much we pay for aluminum cans for our organic soda, how much we pay for electricity. Yet traditionally only large businesses had the budgets to pay for, and enough clout to embed, commodity price risk management into their supply management strategy.

What are Companies’ Biggest Risk Misconceptions? A Conversation with Coupa Economist Ahmad Sadeddin (Part 2)

As a senior economist and risk expert at Coupa, Ahmad Sadeddin is in a good position to see what companies do well and not so well in terms of risk management. Unfortunately, companies are being put to the test more frequently these days, as risks become more numerous and unpredictable. In this second half of our pre-webinar interview with Sadeddin, the risk expert discusses common risk-related misconceptions, challenges that Coupa’s clients have faced and one recent risk success story that impressed him.

Risk Expert Gary Lynch Discusses Hurricane Irma and Supply Chain Insurance (Part 2)

Editor’s note: This is Part 2 in a two-part Q&A. Missed Part 1? Read it here.

The unusually strong and ongoing Atlantic hurricane season prompted us to take a good look at supply chain risk. To that end, we talked to Gary Lynch, founder of The Risk Project (and considered by our own chief research officer Pierre Mitchell as “the best supply risk guru in the world”). In this Part 2 of the Q&A, Lynch talks about different insurances that businesses can consider, which industries are likely to be most affected by Hurricane Irma and why risk can be an asset.

Updating Risk Management for the 21st Century: One CPO’s Approach

Deloitte Global CPO Survey 2016

When the financial crisis struck, in 2008, Ron Wilson learned fast that his company’s approach to managing risk had become obsolete. As chief procurement officer at Wilbur Curtis, Wilson intimately knew the ups and downs of managing a global supply chain. But when it came to risk, the Montebello, California-based manufacturer saw him as the point man — and that was it. The aftermath of the Great Recession made that impossible.

Assessing the Near- and Long-Term Supply Chain Effects from Hurricane Harvey

oil

Procurement professionals have their work cut out for them as rains from Hurricane Harvey finally recede. While the personal and human costs of the disaster are only beginning to be tallied, supply chain and logistics pictures appear even murkier. Here are the top supply chain areas Harvey has disrupted, as well as the near- and long-term consequences procurement organizations will face responding to the storm.

Post-Hurricane Harvey, 3 Supply Chain Risk Mitigation Strategies to Keep in Mind

It’s a simple yet excruciating irony that in a natural disaster that dumps more than 50 inches of rain on a single region, water becomes widely unavailable for consumption — for either people to drink or factories to function — even as it floods scores of neighborhoods. So it’s no surprise that water, and the havoc it continues to wreak in Houston and other areas, is central to the issue of supply chain risk management in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Spend Matters has been covering the hurricane (see related stories below), which had been downgraded to a tropical storm soon after, and the disaster spurred a recent webinar presented by Resilinc, a supply chain resiliency solutions provider.

Hurricane Harvey Q&A: What Procurement Practitioners Should Be Doing Right Now

In this disastrous aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, emerging details about supply chain repercussions both locally and nationally have finally begun to paint a fuller picture. With Houston and its greater regional area comprising such a significant industrial hub, trucking, freight and petrochemical supply have all been frozen to varying degrees. But perhaps the biggest hit is the massive uncertainty over the full extent of the medium and long-term impact. We caught up with riskmethods' Bill DeMartino, general manager of North American operations, and Heiko Schwarz, the firm's founder and managing director, for a quick Q&A about what procurement professionals have been — and what they should be — thinking about in the wake of the disaster's fallout.

Hurricane Harvey Disrupts Supply Chains: Resources for Procurement

supply chain disruption

Hurricane Harvey, now a tropical storm, continues to make headlines as it slowly moved from southeast Texas into southwest Louisiana. The New York Times reports that the storm has dumped a record 51.88 inches of rain on Cedar Bayou, Texas, and that the state’s flood-related death toll has reached 31. In addition to the non-quantifiable losses to the affected residents, the storm is estimated to carry an economic cost of tens of billions of dollars.

There’s a Reason Your Supply Chain is Making You Nauseous: You Don’t Know all of the Risks that Dwell Within It

Something about your supply chain is making you feel like your lunch is about to come back up, and you don’t know why. Sure, you’ve heeded the commodity forecasts and hedged your purchases for the rest of the year. Maybe you even dual sourced a critical component of your product to ensure the first tier of your supply chain is always reliable. But then you start to wonder about the suppliers of the suppliers to those suppliers and how exactly they extracted those raw materials. Or you remember the most recent ransomeware attack and how it shut down that auto manufacturer’s supply chain for several days. And then the nausea sets in.

What Dodd-Frank Repeal? Companies Continue to File Conflict Minerals Disclosures

conflict minerals

The fate of the Dodd-Frank Act — including whether U.S. companies will still be required to trace their conflict minerals — may be up in the air, but many of them are nevertheless conducting audits and filing conflict minerals reports as before. In April, the acting chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) came out against enforcing Dodd-Frank Section 1502, which required companies to trace the origins of any tin, tungsten, tantalum or gold (3TG) used in their products and disclose whether these conflict minerals have been sourced from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).