The Commodity Risk Management Category

Risk Expert Gary Lynch Discusses Hurricane Irma and Supply Chain Insurance (Part 2)

Editor’s note: This is Part 2 in a two-part Q&A. Missed Part 1? Read it here.

The unusually strong and ongoing Atlantic hurricane season prompted us to take a good look at supply chain risk. To that end, we talked to Gary Lynch, founder of The Risk Project (and considered by our own chief research officer Pierre Mitchell as “the best supply risk guru in the world”). In this Part 2 of the Q&A, Lynch talks about different insurances that businesses can consider, which industries are likely to be most affected by Hurricane Irma and why risk can be an asset.

Updating Risk Management for the 21st Century: One CPO’s Approach

Deloitte Global CPO Survey 2016

When the financial crisis struck, in 2008, Ron Wilson learned fast that his company’s approach to managing risk had become obsolete. As chief procurement officer at Wilbur Curtis, Wilson intimately knew the ups and downs of managing a global supply chain. But when it came to risk, the Montebello, California-based manufacturer saw him as the point man — and that was it. The aftermath of the Great Recession made that impossible.

Assessing the Near- and Long-Term Supply Chain Effects from Hurricane Harvey

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Procurement professionals have their work cut out for them as rains from Hurricane Harvey finally recede. While the personal and human costs of the disaster are only beginning to be tallied, supply chain and logistics pictures appear even murkier. Here are the top supply chain areas Harvey has disrupted, as well as the near- and long-term consequences procurement organizations will face responding to the storm.

Post-Hurricane Harvey, 3 Supply Chain Risk Mitigation Strategies to Keep in Mind

It’s a simple yet excruciating irony that in a natural disaster that dumps more than 50 inches of rain on a single region, water becomes widely unavailable for consumption — for either people to drink or factories to function — even as it floods scores of neighborhoods. So it’s no surprise that water, and the havoc it continues to wreak in Houston and other areas, is central to the issue of supply chain risk management in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Spend Matters has been covering the hurricane (see related stories below), which had been downgraded to a tropical storm soon after, and the disaster spurred a recent webinar presented by Resilinc, a supply chain resiliency solutions provider.

Hurricane Harvey Q&A: What Procurement Practitioners Should Be Doing Right Now

In this disastrous aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, emerging details about supply chain repercussions both locally and nationally have finally begun to paint a fuller picture. With Houston and its greater regional area comprising such a significant industrial hub, trucking, freight and petrochemical supply have all been frozen to varying degrees. But perhaps the biggest hit is the massive uncertainty over the full extent of the medium and long-term impact. We caught up with riskmethods' Bill DeMartino, general manager of North American operations, and Heiko Schwarz, the firm's founder and managing director, for a quick Q&A about what procurement professionals have been — and what they should be — thinking about in the wake of the disaster's fallout.

Hurricane Harvey Disrupts Supply Chains: Resources for Procurement

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Hurricane Harvey, now a tropical storm, continues to make headlines as it slowly moved from southeast Texas into southwest Louisiana. The New York Times reports that the storm has dumped a record 51.88 inches of rain on Cedar Bayou, Texas, and that the state’s flood-related death toll has reached 31. In addition to the non-quantifiable losses to the affected residents, the storm is estimated to carry an economic cost of tens of billions of dollars.

There’s a Reason Your Supply Chain is Making You Nauseous: You Don’t Know all of the Risks that Dwell Within It

Something about your supply chain is making you feel like your lunch is about to come back up, and you don’t know why. Sure, you’ve heeded the commodity forecasts and hedged your purchases for the rest of the year. Maybe you even dual sourced a critical component of your product to ensure the first tier of your supply chain is always reliable. But then you start to wonder about the suppliers of the suppliers to those suppliers and how exactly they extracted those raw materials. Or you remember the most recent ransomeware attack and how it shut down that auto manufacturer’s supply chain for several days. And then the nausea sets in.

What Dodd-Frank Repeal? Companies Continue to File Conflict Minerals Disclosures

conflict minerals

The fate of the Dodd-Frank Act — including whether U.S. companies will still be required to trace their conflict minerals — may be up in the air, but many of them are nevertheless conducting audits and filing conflict minerals reports as before. In April, the acting chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) came out against enforcing Dodd-Frank Section 1502, which required companies to trace the origins of any tin, tungsten, tantalum or gold (3TG) used in their products and disclose whether these conflict minerals have been sourced from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

Geopolitical Supply Chain Risk is Knocking on Your Door — Here’s What You Do

Pop quiz, hotshot. There's a bomb on a bus. Once the bus goes 50 miles an hour, the bomb is armed. If it drops below 50, it blows up. What do you do? What do you do? For those of you too young to remember or too old to care, this quote from “Speed,” the summer blockbuster of 1994, delivered by Dennis Hopper’s character, pretty much sums it all up. (I admit, for this 11-year-old at the time, the adrenaline rush was palpable, and with no big Marvel-style special effects!) In a different summer rife with risk — the one we’re in — the quote rings especially true.

Verisk Maplecroft Releases Latest Geopolitical Risk Outlook: Keep An Eye on Emerging Markets

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Emmanuel Macron’s win in the French presidential election was a temporary boon for geopolitical stability, as was Moon Jae-in’s election as the new president of South Korea. U.S. president Donald Trump, however, has managed to become even more of a wildcard. In addition to the above, many emerging markets are at risk of growing instability, according to global risk research firm Verisk Maplecroft, which recently released its 2017 Geopolitical Risk Outlook.

How Falling Commodity Price Risk Affects Your Procurement Function: Webinar 4/28

tamr-webinar

We are living in the midst of a volatile commodities market, which means two things for procurement: new opportunities via supply market intelligence and increased supply chain risk. Good and bad alike, this commodities market is here now and we have to adapt. Risk is especially concentrated in the long tail of spend where procurement can have limited visibility. Join Spend Matters, MetalMiner and Tamr for What Lies Beneath: Hidden Ways Falling Commodity Price Risk Can Wreak Havoc on Your Procurement, Thursday, April 28, at 11 a.m. CDT.

What Toyota’s Latest Supply Risk Event Teaches Us

Toyota supply chain

Toyota's supply chain is much revered for its lean Toyota Production System that it deploys internally and at its suppliers. It does help drive out waste and improve product quality. Yet it’s “necessary but not sufficient” in running an end-to-end supply chain. This was evidenced by several recent events. Most recently, Toyota faced the threat of production line shutdowns in Japan due to a fire at an Aichi Corp. steel plant, which, given the incident occurred back on Jan. 8, makes the potential shutdown all the more shocking to hear.