The Diversity Category

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Procurement Begins with Sourcing: The myConnXion Story

To understand procurement and sourcing as a buyer, we must start with the supplier. Small and diverse businesses are often cited as being more nimble, innovative and cost effective, but are often most strained in resources. Suppliers have to register their profiles with many different buyers (sometimes paying to do so, for buyers who adopt the pay-to-play model) and may not even get a contract as a result of their efforts. On the other side, many buyers end up with outdated supplier information and expired diversity certifications, contaminating their supplier database with inaccurate data. Sourcing with unreliable information hampers the abilities of procurement professionals and negatively impacts bottom line.

‘Pull In’ Initiatives More Effective Than ‘Lean In’ for Retaining and Advancing Women in Supply Chain

women

While women only make up about 20% of supply chain vice presidents today, that share is expected to rise to roughly one in three by 2023, according to a new report from Gartner and AWESOME, a leadership organization focused on the advancement of women in supply chain. Now in its third year, the 2018 Women in Supply Chain Survey focused on supply chain organizations’ initiatives on the retention and advancement of women. It found that while the percentage of women holding executive-level supply chain positions has risen in recent years, the average percentage of women leaders at other levels has remained flat.

The Case for Considering Contingent Workers in Your Diversity & Inclusion Strategy

Contingent workers are now sitting more firmly in the driver’s seat of their careers and are being selective in where they share their talent. While pay is still a significant driver, the culture and work environment of a business are also becoming important factors, similar to those seeking full-time employment. Organizations develop diversity and inclusion (D&I) programs designed to foster teamwork, acceptance and creativity within their full-time employee populations. Given the increased profile of contingent workers within organizations, is it reasonable to expect that this part of the worker population be considered when developing initiatives for the organization as a whole?

How to Incorporate Diversity and Inclusion Practices Into Contingent Labor Programs

supplier diversity

Many organizations struggle with how to incorporate D&I practices within their contingent workforce. In response to concerns regarding co-employment, buying organizations tend to keep non-employees at arm’s length. But given the increasing number of contingent workers in the workforce mix, as well as the central role they are playing in more organizations, one could argue that a different approach should be considered in acknowledgement of the changing dynamics.

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 4) [Plus+]

As we conclude our initial series on creating a roadmap for success with supplier diversity initiatives (see Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3), we come to a handful of final, in many cases tactical, recommendations that can make or break program success. These are the “school of hard knocks” lessons focused on supplier diversity data management that we encourage our readers to take to heart, learning from the mistakes of others (including us) as we’ve helped to rollout and manage these programs over the years for dozens of organizations.

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 3) [Plus+]

Perhaps the most important element that supplier diversity professionals should incorporate into their program management efforts is how to constantly incorporate general procurement efforts within their own. Working with general procurement should be the top priority for diversity teams. All too often, the trap for supplier diversity professionals is to lead a silo-based activity with few touch-points with general procurement.

Nothing New Under the Sun: Taking an Advanced Approach to Supplier Diversity

supplier diversity

Growing up I remember hearing two phrases constantly: “There is nothing new under the sun” and “Numbers never lie.” Both statements I have found to be half-truths. Try telling dinosaurs, phone booths or the former milkman that nothing ever changes. People, things, ideas — all evolve. The time has come for supplier diversity to evolve, as well.

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 2) [Plus+]

For outcomes, whether you get preferred delivery, higher quality, better post-sales support, more favorable warranties or better pricing based on prompt payments as a result of getting diverse suppliers paid faster than the norm, it is important to consider the need to engage the broader finance organization (e.g., AP) and even other functions to implement a program successfully. And try to broaden your vision and go outside the standard procurement playbook in the process.

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 1) [Plus+]

suppliers

There are few areas within the walls of corporate America that stir up emotions and opinions like supplier diversity. Regardless of where you stand regarding supplier diversity programs and how supplier diversity can be done right — because it can definitely be done poorly, even catastrophically so — this research brief is meant to serve as a general primer for procurement professionals needing to bring supplier diversity into their daily activities across the supply management function. We also hope it will prove useful for newly appointed supplier diversity managers and for senior procurement managers and corporate directors wanting to understand how supplier diversity fits in with their business, day to day and strategically. Our intention is to help you make the business case not just for greater investment in diversity programs but for the right programs to begin with. 

ConnXus: Vendor Snapshot (Part 3) — Summary & Competitive Analysis [PRO]

supplier diversity

The market for supplier diversity and supplier management solutions has clearly entered its “2.0” phase. While the DNA of firms competing in this market segment has not changed considerably from the first wave of specialists, the level of capability and overall user experience has evolved considerably since the previous generation of solutions — and what one can do with the solutions has matured, as well.

Users of these solutions can still expect a combination of diversity data enrichment, supplier on-boarding and basic supplier information management capability. But this is now just the ante for a newer generation of providers like ConnXus, a supplier (information) management solution designed to simplify the complexity associated with identifying, qualifying and introducing the right suppliers, including the right diversity suppliers, into global supply chains in a manner that achieves organizational goals of responsible and sustainable sourcing.

This final installment of our multipart Spend Matters PRO Vendor Snapshot series covering ConnXus offers a SWOT analysis, competitive assessment and comparison with other similar and “crossover” providers in the supplier management and supplier diversity market. It also includes a user selection guide and summary evaluation and selection considerations. Part 1 and Part 2 of this PRO research series provide a company and deep-dive solution overview, product strengths and weaknesses and a recommended fit analysis for what types of organizations should consider ConnXus.

ConnXus: Vendor Snapshot (Part 2) — Product Strengths & Weaknesses [PRO]

From a technology and content perspective, the market for supplier diversity-specific supplier management solutions has remained somewhat of a cottage industry for over a decade. Larger vendors, including both software and risk-centric providers, have not been able to take advantage of scale or reach. Further, over the years, even those organizations which have acquired diversity-centric vendors (e.g., Kroll, Jaggaer) have not been able to consolidate the market.

This has opened the door for more recent entrants, such as ConnXus, to not only develop technology, solutions and content for supplier diversity professionals but also to integrate these capabilities with broader offerings across the supplier management spectrum, as well as set a new standard for what should be included in a supplier diversity solution in the first place.

This Spend Matters PRO Vendor Snapshot explores ConnXus’ strengths and weaknesses, providing facts and expert analysis to help procurement organizations decide whether they should consider the provider. The first installment our analysis provided a company and solution overview and a recommend fit list of criteria for firms considering the provider. Part 3 will offer a SWOT analysis, user selection guide, competitive alternatives, and additional evaluation and selection considerations.

Can Procurement Save the Least Diverse Profession in the United States?

forced labor

The biggest change agent for the legal profession could be the as yet unspoken (rather than contractual) pressure from legal firms’ corporate clients, who are pushing their legal partners to go further into supplier diversity efforts. These corporations (e.g., HP, Facebook and Oracle), many of which have instituted their own supplier diversity programs, increasingly want their suppliers and partners to do the same, according to Lee Garbowitz, managing director of Procurement Managed Solutions for HBR Consulting. This helps the partners align strategically, with the ultimate goal of improving brand image and reputation on both sides.