The Finance Category

The Allocation Game — Managing Cost Before Money is Spent

finance

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post form Steven Krueger, principal, and Matt Polvara, senior manager, at Ernst & Young LLP.

With more interest rate hikes a likelihood, banks are poised for growth. But that doesn’t mean they should stop their cost reduction programs. By strategically reducing or eliminating costs, and in particular by optimizing infrastructure costs (which account, on average, for about 40% of a bank’s cost base) banks can be leaner and more agile in a changing economic and regulatory environment. They will be better positioned to face off increasing threats from FinTech firms that are aiming to introduce disruptive technology-enabled business models. Ultimately, banks can reallocate funds they saved to invest in products and technologies to defend or grow market shares.

Overheard on the Quad: What We Learned When Supply Chain Finance Went to University

Michigan State University

Even with the increasing shift in focus to the importance of return on investment for a college education, many young men and women these days pursue a college education to answer foundational questions about themselves. It’s no surprise, accordingly, that so many university mottos include the word “veritas,” a nod to students and professors alike searching for “truth.” Likewise, as our sister site Trade Financing Matters explains, supply chain finance recently went back to school, under the tutelage of Professor David Wuttke of the EBS Business School. His team at EBS, in collaboration with Orbian, has been seeking the truth about trade finance, including a few foundational questions of their own.

Accounts Payable and Digital Transformation: The Next Frontier

finance

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Anna Tujunen, head of product at Dooap.

Digital transformation, buzzword or not, is vital to the success of today’s business. In the immortal words of Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, “Every company is a software company.” It’s no longer an option to incorporate technology into company organization but a necessity. There is no other option but to go digital or go down with the past. Many areas of business and development have been impacted by digital transformation, including HR, DevOps, asset management, and finance. It’s high time for accounts payable to join the digital revolution.

The Consumer Products Supply Chain: A Changing Consumer Affects Financial Dynamics

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post by Guy Courtin, vice president of industry and solution strategy at Infor Retail.

Tell me if you’ve heard this before: the world of retail has changed. The balance of power has shifted from retailers, and the brands they carry, to the consumer. Traditional retailers are being forced to shift their perspective on inventory, align with customer needs and better integrate e-commerce and mobile commerce — all while facing the pressures of an ever-changing retail landscape. But what about consumer product goods companies (CPG)? Are they immune from these changes? Absolutely not.

How to Justify Spend Analysis to Finance/IT When There’s No Clear ROI (Part 2) [Plus+]

funding

Yesterday, we discussed the first five of 10 possible strategies to justify a spend analysis initiative to finance/IT despite the catch-22 that comes from not knowing the potential value that may come from the initial investment. Today we pick up with recommendations six through 10 and close with some final remarks and recommendations.

How to Justify Spend Analysis to Finance/IT When There’s No Clear ROI (Part 1) [Plus+]

finance

Analytics are all the rage. And spend analysis is Procurement 101. So, getting some reasonable investment shouldn't be a problem, right? Wrong. The problem with analytics is that the identified value is all “option value.” You don't know how much value opportunity you will uncover with the analytics until you actually perform them (and implement the identified opportunities)! This article is designed to help you overcome this catch-22. We've prepared 10 strategies to help you get the ball rolling with IT and finance (even if the ROI isn't clear).

Finance: Friend or Foe for Procurement Hires?

interview

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Nick Lazzara and Naseem Malik, of MRA Global Sourcing.

So, you’re ready for an executive role in a company’s procurement function and getting ready to razzle dazzle your future leadership, including the CPO. Yet you also notice that the CFO is one of the interviewers, and you’re eager to get the nod from this important executive and stakeholder. The savvy procurement practitioner will be cognizant of the difference between indirect and direct spend responsibilities and prepare accordingly.

Procurement is from Mars and Finance is from Jupiter: How to Align Planets [Plus+]

finance

Mars might be the god of war and mighty in its own right – ready to battle any time with a combative supplier or recalcitrant internal stakeholder. But Jupiter is the king of gods: large, distant, cold, foreboding. (There is no Venus here...that's a Plus brief — nay, multipart series — for another day on working with Marketing). These gods might seem similar, and in the business world, Procurement and Finance should in theory be highly aligned and focused on cost management, risk mitigation, quantitative analysis, and other areas. For example:

  • Enterprise risk management requirements (e.g., fraud, regulatory compliance, etc.) should extend seamlessly into the supply base.
  • Working capital should be optimized alongside cost reduction and compliance.
  • The Source-to-Settle process should have an embedded P2P process that aligns purchasing and AP to each other and to broader spend category requirements.
There are many things that keep the two groups from singing Kumbaya. In this Spend Matters Plus brief, we list five important ones and give practitioners some suggestions on how to align and conquer (no lightning bolts or Holst necessary).

How Can Procurement Help in Making a Sport Franchise Profitable?

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Deepesh Jethwani, consultant at GEP.

If you had a genie in a magic lamp and you were allowed three wishes, what would they be? For me, owning a professional sports team or franchise would be right on top of that list. I have been following cricket, football and tennis since my childhood, and the prospect of owning Manchester United, Mumbai Indians or Indian Aces is exciting enough to dream about. Have you also wondered about the cost of owning a professional sports team? This blog is an attempt to identify those costs and to understand how a professional sports franchise can limit costs wherever possible.

Decoding Border Tax Speculation: A Sourcing Advisor Explains the Top Priorities for Procurement

In a related article last week, we tried to get (a little closer) to the bottom of the whole Mexico border tax issue. Although there are still two potential camps of “tax” — President Trump’s potential blanket tax on Mexican imports, and the broader Border Adjustment Tax (BAT) that comes from proposed Republican corporate tax reform — procurement organizations on both sides of the border have immediate concerns.

Can We Get to the Bottom of Trump’s Border Tax?

10%. 20%. 35%. These are all numbers that the Trump administration has put on the table, at various times, as suggested levels of import tax that the administration threatens to levy on goods from countries such as Mexico if the U.S. companies importing them don’t move their overseas operations back to the States...right? Not so fast. It turns out that there are a few different things this whole “border tax” thing could mean.

Rapid Ratings: Vendor Snapshot (Part 2) — Product Strengths and Weaknesses [PRO]

In the beginning of this Rapid Ratings Vendor Snapshot, the initial framework we incorporated showed how a supplier’s financial health was the keystone of broader risks in the supply chain. In other words, assurance of a supplier’s ability to deliver with consistency and quality requires assurance of a healthy supplier. To ascertain the financial health of the supplier, you can monitor its public financial data from Bloomberg or other external sources. This can be valuable if you know how to operationalize the information and can do it in a scalable and replicable way for many suppliers, over time.

But this doesn’t account for financial data from privately held companies that, for most corporations, account for 70%–80% of their strategic/critical suppliers. Such data on this group of suppliers is generally sparse, sometimes difficult to interpret, often unreliable for prediction and challenging to benchmark against peer firms. This is why Rapid Ratings’ approach to assessing supplier financial health (especially for this group) is attractive and unique. RapidRating’s FHR® (Financial Health Rating) is a focused and cost-effective supply risk monitoring solution that creates a forward-looking assessment of financial viability for the dozens or hundreds of key suppliers an organization may have — privately held or otherwise.

This Spend Matters PRO Vendor Snapshot explores Rapid Ratings’ strengths and weaknesses, providing facts and expert analysis to help procurement organizations decide whether they should consider the provider. The first installment of our analysis provided a company and solution overview and a recommend fit list of criteria for firms considering it. Part 3 will offer a SWOT analysis, user selection guide, competitive alternatives, and additional evaluation and selection considerations.