Public Sector Content

Supplier Selection Tips: Do This, Don’t Do That

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Public Spend Forum, a sister site of ours.

Selecting the perfect contractor is essential to ensure your department is able to achieve its goals to reach its full potential. One bad choice can spoil the entire operation and disproportionately set back fiscal and business goals. Follow our helpful supplier selection tips, and don’t let you or your department fall victim to avoidable problems. In this article, we will take you through the separate stages of supplier selection and give you helpful tips on each so you can be sure the contractor you choose is the contractor you need. We’ve broken down the selection process into five stages:

Afternoon Coffee: Truce on China Tariff Still Puts Pressure on Supply Chains; Levi’s Agrees to Cut Emissions

After more U.S. tariffs against China were put on hold, stocks and oil prices increased Monday, though there was no breakthrough on the economic conflict between the two countries. Levi Strauss & Co. has partnered with IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, where IFC will work with 42 of Levi's suppliers to roll out renewable energy and water-saving projects. Afternoon Coffee brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news.

7 Steps to Better Government Market Research

Doing better government market research is the latest topic from Public Spend Forum that we’ll address in Spend Matters’ weekly look at public sector procurement. PSF, a sister site of ours, has published articles addressing four of the seven steps for better government market research. It also offers free tools and templates that you can use to improve your market and supplier research outcomes. Let’s look at the full list and then delve into the details on the first four steps.

A look at GovShop and its agile insights as feds shift software development methodologies

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Public Spend Forum, a sister site of ours. It runs GovShop, a single place to search online, find and connect with suppliers for the public sector market. We'll occasionally highlight GovShop's capabilities in our Friday series on public spend. Today's story looks focuses on agile resources that can be found with GovShop.

The federal government has begun making significant strides in the monumental task of shifting software development methodologies from traditional waterfall development to a more modern agile development methodology. While this road will continue to be a long one, there are pockets of excellence in DoD, CMS and the VA (just to name a few). As much as this transition requires both culture change and resources on the government’s part, it is also highly dependent on a new breed of government contractors that are nimble, highly motivated, tech-savvy and of course agile.

Within this community of agile vendors, there are a few different disciplines that are collectively aiding the transition. These disciplines can be thought of as doing, advising and teaching. Within GovShop, these disciplines have been identified as Agile Development, Agile Coaching and Agile Training.

Watchdog Gone Wild? Why New York City’s Procurement Technology Overhaul is Actually a Good Thing

magnifying glass analysis

Recent media reports have alleged that New York City has been overpaying for its implementation of procurement software suite provider Ivalua in NYC’s procurement transformation efforts. The reports have used a watchdog group’s analysis that has tried to compare the seemingly high price tag of the NYC implementation of Ivalua to a smaller implementation of the city of Dallas by a more niche software provider named Bonfire. Ivalua and Bonfire are two procurement software providers that Spend Matters covers within the broad procurement provider ecosystem.

The headlines appeared suspicious, and we decided to take a deeper look at the projects and the providers in question. Our analysis indicates that one report’s direct comparison of these costs is misleading and flawed. We have a few takeaways from the group’s conclusions, and our analysis indicates that the NYC deal could easily pay for itself and be a boon for the city.

How to Use Drones in the Public Sector and Procure Their Services

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Public Spend Forum, a sister site of ours that each week helps us look at public sector procurement. This week we explore the increasing use of drones — in agriculture, construction, emergency response — and how to procure those services.

We are truly in the modern era — drones are now everywhere, no longer just tools for movie making or toys for tech-savvy teens. And “everywhere” includes their increasing use in the public sector. Between 2016 and 2017, drone bids and RFPs saw a growth of 194%. To properly cover this important topic, this article will focus on:

— What drones can be used for in the public sector
— Tips to keep in mind when procuring drones

7 Ways to Improve Your Public Procurement, Acquisition Knowledge

Recently, the lessons we’ve drawn from Public Spend Forum articles have focused on doing the basics of public procurement well, and this week’s post will look at a workforce competency model that PSF has helped create to develop procurement professionals by exploring seven competency areas that can take your government-contracting organization to the next level.

After taking what we learned from the beginner’s guide to the procurement cycle, we’ll see what wider lessons we can draw by looking at advice for government procurement workers given by PSF, a sister site of ours.

So what is the Public Procurement Workforce Competency Model? Read on for the highlights.

3 Reasons Why Public Sector Tenders Should Use Dynamic Purchasing Systems

procurement software

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Marko Rossi, product manager for Cloudia, a source-to-pay provider.

Dynamic purchasing systems have advantages over the venerable framework agreement, which has been the go-to structure for public sector authorities looking to procure goods and services for many years. Designed to remove uncertainty, traditional framework agreements typically bind vendors and authorities into four-year relationships that ensure all parties within the agreement commit to each other for the long term.

This works perfectly well — if the pace of societal and economic change is serene. The world today doesn’t quite fit this picture. A supplier that meets buyer requirements today may go out of business tomorrow, or their circumstances may change so drastically that they may struggle to fulfill their contractual duties.

Dynamic purchasing systems (DPS) were purpose-built to address these flaws. Read on to find out the three reasons public sector tenders should use DPS.

Public Sector Services: What a ‘Person Year’ is and Other Work-Hour Quirks for Government Contracting

In writing up government contracts for public sector services instead of goods, companies have to calculate the hours of work to be done, and that requires estimating an employee’s full-time equivalent (FTE) hours. And because public sector contracts can last years, the language often must be given in “person years,” the amount of work a person can do in a year. It seems simple, but as Public Spend Forum reveals in its look at the issues, it can get complicated in a hurry.

For Procurement Problems in Government Contracting, Try These Outsider Tips

Government contracting is known as a detail-oriented process that relies on plans and procedures, but Public Spend Forum is offering tips to help companies with procurement problems so they can improve the process where they can. And that involves changing your mindset, being flexible and ensuring that you have talented people. The tips come from the agile model for addressing the constant change associated with modern business, and Public Spend Forum, a sister site of ours, explains how these principles can relate to procurement practices.

5 Tips for Government Agencies, Suppliers to Communicate Better

In public procurement, government agencies tend to be tight-lipped when dealing with potential suppliers who are bidding on their contracts. That stems from being risk-averse, says Public Spend Forum, a sister site of ours that offers five tips for improving the communication between government agencies and suppliers. But what’s behind this friction between these groups that needs to be eased?

Public Spend Tips: Prep for All Types of Meetings to Help Land Government Contracts

contract

I’ve called this meeting about government contracts with you, the reader, to check in with Public Spend Forum, a sister site of our, to see what’s going on in public procurement. PSF has a list of tips and advice on something that seems simple but is widely derided: having a meeting. Meetings can be successful if you know what you’re trying to accomplish. And that takes knowing the different types of gatherings that acquisition pros might attend in a week — customer meetings, informal meetings with prospective contractors, formal meetings with suppliers and contractors, negotiations, source selection meetings, post-award contract kickoff meeting, and contract closeout meetings.