The Services Procurement & Contingent Labor Category

WorkMarket (ADP): What Makes It Great (Independent Contract Workers SolutionMap Analysis)

Upwork Enterprise

WorkMarket, acquired by ADP in January 2018, offers an enterprise technology solution that companies can use to organize, manage and pay their freelance (independent) workforce. The provider competes in the enterprise solution category that Spend Matters SolutionMap calls Independent Contract Workers (ICW), the most dynamic segment of the contingent workforce and services (CW/S) procurement software market, which also includes SolutionMap’s Temp Staffing (Vendor Management Systems/VMS) and Contract Services/Statement of Work solution segments.

Today’s ICW solutions have their roots in the so-called gig, freelance and peer-to-peer economies — the new world of Uber and Airbnb versus the established world of enterprise software applications inhabited for decades by the likes of SAP and Oracle. WorkMarket originated as a vertically focused online marketplace that enabled the matching and spot engagement of field tech contractors. Over the past eight years, however, WorkMarket has significantly invested in technology development so it could evolve its business model from that of an online marketplace to a full-fledged enterprise software provider.

Where does that offering fit into the burgeoning ICW market? As of September 2018, Spend Matters SolutionMap contains functional and customer satisfaction benchmarks on more than 50 vendors within the procurement software market, including six providers within the ICW segment. To understand where WorkMarket stands out most and helps set the bar for the ICW segment — and why should this matter for procurement and HR organizations — let’s delve into the SolutionMap benchmark and explore what makes WorkMarket great.

“What Makes It Great” is a recurring column that shares insights from each quarterly SolutionMap report for SolutionMap Insider subscribers. Based on both our rigorous evaluation process and customer reference reviews, each brief offers quick facts on the provider, describes where it excels, provides hard data on where it beats the SolutionMap benchmark and concludes with a checklist for ideal customer scenarios in which procurement, finance and supply chain organizations should consider it.

Number of High-Earning Independent Workers Is Rising, MBO Report Says

workers

A select group of high-earning workers has been increasing, according to a recent research brief from MBO Partners, stemming from the firm’s eighth-annual 2018 State of Independence in America report. The report estimates that of the more than 15 million full-time independent workers, 3.3 million are high earners — defined as earning $100,000 per year or more. This group has grown nearly 70% since 2011, despite that the overall number of full-time independents in total actually declined over that same period.

ADP and the Future of Work (Part 3) — Strategy Assessment [PRO]

In Part 1 of this Spend Matters PRO series, we summarized ADP’s business characteristics, its market and financial strength, and its increased investment in innovation R&D as a backdrop and foundation for the pursuit of its future-of-work strategy. In Part 2, we examined the significant technology developments and recent strategic acquisitions that make up key execution components of the strategy. In this third installment of this series, we will step back and provide our perspective on ADP’s future-of-work strategy, both our view of what it is and what it may mean in a broader industry context.

Procurement, C-suite Often Not on Same Page About Hiring and Development, Experts Say

marketing procurement

A frequent topic in procurement is how can CPOs get a seat at the chief executives’ table, but finding that sweet spot with the C-suite can be elusive. Some of the frustration comes from procurement departments and C-suites being misaligned on how to hire the best people, a study shows. And procurement veterans at a recent APICS conference said hiring talented people and developing the current staff can help with that high-level relationship.

ADP and the Future of Work (Part 2) — Innovation R&D, Acquisitions [PRO]

interest rates

In Part 1 of this PRO series, we laid out ADP’s business characteristics, its market and financial strength, and its increased investment in innovation R&D as a backdrop and foundation for its pursuit of its future of work strategy. In this second part of the series, we examine the significant technology developments and recent strategic acquisitions that make up key execution components of the strategy. Part 3 will bring the pieces together to describe this strategy and what it may mean in a broader industry context.

ADP and the Future of Work (Part 1) — The Foundation [PRO]

Spend Matters’ coverage of ADP — the global payroll, human capital management (HCM) solution and HR managed services provider — had been infrequent since mid-2015, when ADP sold its procure-to-pay business to Oildex. That made sense since Spend Matters tends to focus on technology and innovation from the procurement perspective, and (given ADP’s traditional focus on internal employees), there was not even much of a link to the contingent workforce area.

But that changed in early 2018, when ADP acquired the freelancer management system (FMS) WorkMarket, and it soon became clear that something larger was brewing at ADP. In fact, we have since looked more closely and found that the company is not only executing a strategy to address needs related to the growing freelancer or independent contract workforce (ICW) — but it also is making a great leap forward in rolling-out a leading-edge core technology platform for its payroll and HCM solutions and services, something that will no doubt play a role in the company’s freelancer/ICW, agile total workforce and overall future of work strategy.

The future of workforce sourcing, engagement, management and compensation is that of human capital management as well as payment “platforms” and digital ecosystems that bring together businesses (large and small), ecosystem technology and services partners and, last but not least, workers of different generations, localities, economic strata and types of work arrangements. That includes dynamic arrangements: part-time or temporary employment, on-demand intermittent gigs or moonlighting, and freelance/independent contract worker engagements.

In this three-part PRO brief, we will provide a refresh on ADP and how it is strategically addressing the “future of work” head-on. Part 1 will provide a summary overview of ADP and how the company has been strategically investing in innovation and technology to address the future of work. Part 2 will identify and discuss significant technology developments and recent strategic acquisitions, key execution components of ADP’s future of work strategy. Finally, Part 3 will bring many of the pieces together to form a picture (or more accurately, a sketch) of how ADP is moving forward to address a future of workforce management that is increasingly digital and decentralized, and where the needs and expectations of client businesses AND workers are already diverging from those that were stable for decades.

Upwork Enterprise: What Makes It Great (Independent Contract Workforce Analysis)

Coworks

Upwork, the well-known, global online freelancer marketplace, is increasingly becoming known for its Upwork Enterprise solution, a combination of technology and managed services designed to enable enterprises to source and engage freelance talent. Upwork Enterprise was recently evaluated in Spend Matters’ SolutionMap framework with the Independent Contract Workforce (ICW) enterprise solution category. The ICW solution segment is the most dynamic part of the contingent and workforce and services (CW/S) procurement technology market, which also includes the Temp Staffing (Vendor Management Systems/VMS) and Contract Services/Statement of Work solution segments.

Today’s ICW enterprise solutions — many originating, like Upwork, as online marketplaces — have their roots (or at least their impetus) in the so-called gig, freelance and peer-to-peer “economies” (the new world of Uber and Airbnb versus the establishment world of enterprise software applications inhabited for decades by providers like SAP and Oracle). Some of these “gig economy” solution providers have been clawing their way into larger enterprises with new technology platforms to allow those organizations to scale up their use of freelancers sourced through online platforms. This is what Upwork has been doing with Upwork Enterprise, which goes go market now as a combined managed services and technology solution (analogous, up to a point, of traditional managed service providers with their own VMS technology).

In the ICW solution segment, Upwork Enterprise is a unique solution that provides a set of functionality and services that organizations of any size can use to source, engage and pay remote, online freelancers and agencies from Upwork’s global marketplace. It provides clients with robust capabilities that includes management of SOW projects and the organization of preferred providers (freelancers/agencies) in private talent pools. And the value of the platform also is being amplified by a growing set of managed services and solution offerings.

Where does Upwork Enterprise fit into the burgeoning ICW market? As of September 2018, the Spend Matters SolutionMap contains functional and customer satisfaction benchmarks on over 50 providers within the procurement technology landscape, including six providers within the ICW segment. But where does Upwork Enterprise stand out most and help “set the bar” in for the ICW segment? And why should this matter for procurement and HR organizations? Let’s delve into the SolutionMap benchmark to find out where Upwork Enterprise is great.

“What Makes It Great” is a recurring column that shares insights from each quarterly SolutionMap report for SolutionMap Insider subscribers. Based on both our rigorous evaluation process and customer reference reviews, each brief offers quick facts on the provider, describes where it excels, provides hard data on where it beats the SolutionMap benchmark and concludes with a checklist for ideal customer scenarios in which procurement, finance and supply chain organizations should consider it.

Upwork Is Now A Publicly Traded Company: The World of Work Is Indeed Changing

procurement solutions stocks

Upwork, the world’s largest online freelancer marketplace provider, went public today on the Nasdaq exchange. The IPO has been anticipated since Upwork announced its Form S-1 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in early September. The opening share price today was set at $15, above the price range of $12–$14 noted in last week’s amended S-1. The proceeds of the sale of 12.48 million shares were $187 million, well above the $100 million anticipated in the S-1.

Upwork Is Going Public: What It Means for Contingent Workforce Procurement and Human Resources Executives [PRO]

stock prices

Upwork’s prospective initial public offering constitutes a significant marker in the steadily evolving contingent workforce and services procurement and the overall human capital management space, where enterprise executives and line-managers are dealing with seriously imbalanced supply and demand, increasing requirements for workforce flexibility and agility, and a parade of new, non-traditional, technology-driven solutions to the problem of “getting the work done.” This is true in a number of ways and at a number of levels.

In September, Upwork, the largest global online freelancer marketplace and the provider of Upwork Enterprise, announced an IPO plan to list its common stock as an emerging growth company on the Nasdaq Global Market.

Its SEC filings revealed a $10 to $12 per-share-price range. Net proceeds from the IPO (after repayment of $16 million in notes) could range, as reported by the California-based company, between $64 million and $74 million and would be used for working capital and other general corporate purposes, including product development, general and administrative matters, and capital expenditures. Based on the filings, Upwork’s IPO valuation could range from $1 billion to over $1.25 billion (about 5X revenue).

Spend Matters has closely covered Upwork developments for several years. And the Upwork Enterprise solution was recently evaluated and recommended within Spend Matters SolutionMaps for Contingent Workforce and Services (CW/S) enterprise technology solutions (specifically, in the category of solutions that address independent contract worker (ICW) sourcing, engagement, management and payment).

While this PRO report will draw a number of key points from the trove of new, previously insider-only information about Upwork, readers can access all of those details with one click in the amended Form S-1 filed with the SEC. The purpose of this PRO brief is more to analyze what this event means for executives in contingent workforce and services procurement and HR, many of whom may not be up to speed on changes taking place in the CW/S space — in particular, new types of platform intermediaries that have the potential to substantially enhance an enterprise’s workforce sourcing effectiveness and efficiency, engagement flexibility and structural agility.

The Contingent Workforce and Services Insider’s Hot List: October 2018 [Plus+]

Welcome to the October 2018 edition of Spend Matters’ monthly feature, “The Contingent Workforce and Services (CW/S) Insider’s Hot List,” available to Plus and PRO subscribers. For those new to the Hot List, each edition covers the prior month’s important and sometimes just plain interesting technology and innovation developments within the CW/S space. Over the last several months, this space has seen both significant change and inertia co-exist, yet the change is not slowing down — quite the contrary.

The September Hot List covered a broad range of developments, ranging from the Ernst & Young acquisition of U.K.-based alternative legal services provider (ALSP) Riverview Law, to the partnership of Jaggaer with Science Exchange, a marketplace for outsourced R&D, all the way to some of the latest blockchain-based work intermediation intermediation platforms, such as Moonlighting. In the meantime, other developments continued percolate around the innovative edge of the defined CW/S space. Altogether these developments reflect an industry that is undergoing widespread transformation.

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How Procurement Best Practices Are Stifling Innovation — And What to Do About It

disruption

Many companies have discovered that best practices for managing professional services spend have imposed financial discipline but have come at the expense of innovation and organizational agility. Now, growing interest in agile development methodologies — in which small, cross-functional teams are empowered to work independently on complex problems — is prompting procurement officers to wonder whether the on-demand talent marketplace could help them regain ground at a lower price point. After all, the push for agility is driven by a need for companies to respond more quickly to opportunities and threats by nimbly adjusting the assets — including human ones — they put against each one.

To Deliver Superior Field Services Outcomes, Businesses Should Look to the Freelance Economy

Managing a modern-day field service function presents numerous challenges to business leaders. Consistently getting the right person for a service request to the right place at the right time has only become more difficult in today’s hyper-competitive, on-demand business environment. To meet these challenges, businesses have increasingly looked to augment their current W-2 field service employees by engaging third-party vendors. But while diversifying beyond full-time technicians is a reasonable start, businesses should not stop at merely outsourcing field services functions to external partners.