The Shared Services Category

SAP Ariba Takes Aim at Procurement CoEs Services with A Targeted Shared Services Offering


Procurement shared services teams — also known as centers of excellence (CoEs) — don’t get enough respect. In larger companies, they are often critical not only to bringing greater operating efficiency to AP and P2P transaction processing but are also increasingly involved in strategic areas including market intelligence, strategic sourcing and even sourcing optimization. Many of SAP Ariba’s customers have CoEs or are in the process of building of them. But as far as we know, no source-to-pay technology provider has come out with a specific module just for them. Until now.

Procurement as a Service (PRaaS) — Part 4: Assembling Third-Party Services

supplier network

In our previous installment of this series, we discussed how an industrialized procurement as a service (PRaaS) model is critical to not just running procurement more efficiently and effectively but also buying and embedding cloud services better, as well as tie procurement into broader digital business strategy efforts. The notion of procurement as a “prosumer” (producer and consumer) of procurement services is both the DNA of modern procurement itself and of global business services.

Procter & Gamble is a great example. P&G was one of the pioneers of the global business services (GBS) model, and its current capabilities here are impressive. What’s also interesting about P&G was when its CEO drove the “connect and develop” program of open innovation to tap supply markets for product innovation and looking beyond internal R&D.

So, if R&D can do that for itself, shouldn't procurement be able to do the same? And isn't it even more important for procurement to do so when considering that nearly all supply market innovation tied to supplier spending is in play? Wouldn't it be important for procurement to lead by example in aggressively adopting such third-party services and also to share best practices around how other internal stakeholders in various spend categories are doing the same? You bet. This makes procurement an innovation gate opener rather than a policy gatekeeper.

Procurement as a Service (PRaaS) — Part 3: Unpacking the Services Stack


In Part 1 of the series, we delved into why procurement should run itself as a services business, and in Part 2, we shared how procurement can learn from other types of professional services businesses to bring more rigor and value to its internal customers and even external customers. On this last point, organizations such as GE, IBM and others have been masterful at industrializing various services internally, and then using themselves as success stories to externalize those services to new customers. In doing this, they are trying to establish themselves as digital platforms that will be the underlying architecture of emerging digital value chains.

So, what does this have to do with procurement? Many things:

  • As we discussed in Part 2, procurement and other stakeholders must understand how supply markets are fundamentally shifting as this digital transformation occurs. Such disruption is not just the “Amazoning” or “Ubering” of the supply chain, but services, too. For example, consider the mind-blowing transformation that Infosys is embarking on with its Mana platform and its Zero Distance approach to innovating service delivery.
  • Procurement can use this trend to its advantage to bring some leverage to relationships with large incumbent providers that may be threatened. This is also a great time to be a “customer of choice” and use strategic supplier management to capture innovation from your incumbent suppliers while also testing out emerging digital services providers.
  • It’s also critical to understand the implications of signing up on someone else's platform and what that means to switching costs down the road, as well as to what extend today’s suppliers don’t become tomorrow’s competitors.
  • Finally, if your company is going through a digital transformation to execute a new digital business strategy where your firm may also be positioning as a “platform,” then it’s important to understand platform-based business models and also cloud-based architectures (i.e., an XaaS model that lets you deliver these services scalably over the web) to more easily plug and play supplier XaaS services (see IBM cloud reference architecture as an example) into your procurement services.

The IBM architecture diagram can be a little overwhelming, so, let me show you a slightly simpler procurement version of this “aaS” architecture and give some examples of some innovative services. Actually, it’s not simple either, but it’s as simple as it can be while explaining the fundamental design of the PRaaS model in one diagram.

Elemica: Shifting From a Shared Services Bazaar to Platform “PaaS” Standard [PRO]

In this series covering Elemica and the platform shift, we’ll explore Elemica’s platform strategy, including associated infrastructure and application components. We will also touch on how these platform building blocks fit into an evolving technology landscape that will increasingly prioritize interoperability and collaboration between organizations as much as internal processes and systems integration.