The Supplier Management Category

Building the Business Case for Managing Suppliers with Technology: 7 ROI Levers (Introduction) [PRO]

If Rodney Dangerfield had ever worked in procurement, he would have been in charge of supplier management. While supplier management does get some respect, the late Dangerfield certainly would have agreed it does not get the respect it deserves.

Part of the challenge in garnering respect for supplier management is that it touches on so many workstreams, processes and business functions. And we’ve got to say, it’s also not as sexy as spend analytics, strategic sourcing, contract management or even spend management. Compounding these challenges is that few procurement, finance and shared services organizations have earnestly attempted to develop a business case and ROI model for investing in supplier management on an end-to-end basis. But trust us: If you do, you’ll run (not walk) to doing it right.

This Spend Matters PRO research series aims to both demystify the business benefits of doing supplier management “right” and help organizations build a business case to invest in supplier management processes, as well as supporting software. It also explores the ROI drivers organizations might consider in creating their own business case for rolling out a supplier management solution or building on investments they’ve already made.

In the first two installments of this series, we introduce the primary ROI levers of supplier management, starting first with those at the front end of the supplier lifecycle that can help with building a business case. Later in the series, we will provide more detailed ROI model inputs and ranges that can be used in building a business case in each of these areas.

Spend Matters PRO clients can also contact their client services representative for an interactive Excel-based ROI model that can serve as the basis for building supplier management business cases.

Are CSR Clauses Truly Effective in Improving Supply Chain Sustainability? (Part 1)

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) clauses are a common feature in contracts between buyers and suppliers. Yet the vague language of the majority of these clauses suggests limited effectiveness in actually bringing about sustainable practices, according to a recent study of more than 550 buyers and suppliers conducted by EcoVadis. Today, the adoption of CSR practices is quickly becoming the norm. According to the International Association of Contract and Commercial Managers (IACCM), nearly three-quarters of companies include a sustainability clause in their procurement contracts. Moreover, half also monitor their suppliers’ environmental and social performance.

Finalizing the Business Case for SRM Investment

Spend Matters welcomes this guest series from Sean Harley, co-founder and CEO of LUPR. 

In this final entry in our blog series on developing the business case for investment in supplier relationship management (SRM) capabilities, we bring together all of the various elements we’ve discussed in the preceding blogs. We’ll also be responding to reader feedback in the comments section. The business case for SRM must be based on a diverse and complementary suite of benefits directly supporting your organization’s business strategy, whether through hard dollar estimates or other means.

ConnXus: What Makes It Great (Supplier Management SolutionMap Analysis)

Editor’s note: This “What Makes it Great” column is normally reserved for SolutionMap Insider Subscribers, but ConnXus has generously agreed to support access for readers who are not yet members.  

Supplier management technology has traditionally been a bit like Beaujolais nouveau: developed quickly (in certain cases on an ad hoc basis to meet specific needs) but not necessarily prone to aging well. ConnXus, a relatively recent entrant on the supplier management and supplier diversity scene (see our three-part Vendor Snapshot on the provider here, here and here), is a case in point, rapidly eclipsing previous generation solutions.

ConnXus’ recent Q2 2018 SolutionMap performance provides compelling evidence that it sets the standard not only for what to expect in a modern supplier diversity solution but also what organizations should look for overall when searching for a Nimble supplier management technology provider. Join us in exploring what make ConnXus great, based on the latest functional and customer SolutionMap benchmarks from Q2 2018.

“What Makes it Great” is a recurring column that shares insights from each quarterly SolutionMap report for SolutionMap Insider Subscribers. Based on both our rigorous evaluation process and customer reference reviews, each brief explains how the provider excels and where it beats the SolutionMap benchmark, concluding with a checklist for ideal customer scenarios in which procurement, finance and supply chain organizations should consider the vendor.

SynerTrade: What Makes It Great (Supplier Management SolutionMap Analysis)

procurement software

SynerTrade is actively driving awareness of its brand beyond continental Europe, where it has a base of hundreds of customers. Yet the source-to-pay suite provider is already equipped to compete on the world procurement technology stage.

Out of the 45 participants in Spend Matters SolutionMaps for Q2 2018, SynerTrade is one of only five providers that make all 10 recommended personas for strategic procurement technologies and source-to-pay suites. One area in particular where SynerTrade differentiates itself is in the increasingly critical supplier management area, which the provider uses to unite each component of its suite.

“What Makes it Great” is a recurring column that shares insights from each quarterly SolutionMap report for SolutionMap Insider Subscribers. Based on both our rigorous evaluation process and customer reference reviews, each brief explains how the provider excels and where it beats the SolutionMap benchmark, concluding with a checklist for ideal customer scenarios in which procurement, finance and supply chain organizations should consider the vendor.

Tradeshift’s “Sellers Club” Targets Bottomline and Accounts Receivable Technology With a Many-to-Many Offering

Sarika Garg, Tradeshift’s chief strategy officer, took the podium for a few minutes at Tradeshift’s analyst day to introduce what the procurement/finance technology provider is calling its “Seller’s Club.” The concept is that the “Club” is a membership, not a subscription. While a supplier-paid offering, Garg made the point of noting that Tradeshift remains free for suppliers to transact. Our take is that the Club appears to be a new offering for suppliers that is taking aim at another class of solutions entirely compared with procurement, accounts payable automation and supplier network offerings aimed at the buyer — where Tradeshift started.

Tradeshift Analyst Day Dispatch: “Do You Want Amazon to Own Your Supplier Relationships?”

On a well-timed East Coast swing, Lisa Reisman (Azul Partners’ fearless CEO) and I dropped by New York City for Tradeshift’s analyst day, the Tradeshift Innovation Summit. Christian Lanng, Tradeshift’s founder and CEO, kicked off the afternoon with a history lesson, drawing the parallel between Salesforce and the path he suggests that Tradeshift is on. He began his talk by noting that in 1999, Oracle, Siebel and SAP were “fighting it out over CRM” when the market was “fragmented, verticalized and on-premise.” But Salesforce came along with a different vision, building “software for the end-user” with an emphasis on “cloud” and eventually its “app” platform.

Building the Business Case for SRM (Part 5): Assessing Stakeholder Satisfaction

Spend Matters welcomes this guest series from Sean Harley, co-founder and CEO of LUPR.

Part 5 of this series on developing the business case for investing in supplier relationship management (SRM) capabilities focuses on assessing stakeholder satisfaction with current SRM practices. When SRM is neglected, the speed of contracting, supplier responses to performance issues, and the ease of collaboration between all parties — suppliers, procurement and internal stakeholders — tends to suffer. The best way to identify key pain points is to conduct thorough surveys of both your suppliers and internal stakeholders. This will help you understand the wider picture, highlighting common threads that harm your ability to work effectively with suppliers.

SolutionMap: 40 Procurement Software Companies, Ranked (Q2 2018 Update)

procurement software

Spend Matters today released its Q2 2018 SolutionMap, ranking 40 procurement software companies across nine different solution categories, including E-Procurement, Sourcing, Spend Analytics, Supplier Relationship Management and Contract Lifecycle Management, in addition to end-to-end suites and their capabilities. So what's new this quarter? Read on to take a peek under the hood.

SRM Provider Kodiak Rating to Develop Blockchain to Improve Supply Chain Transparency

blockchain

The Stockholm-based supplier relationship management provider Kodiak Rating announced that it will apply blockchain technology to improve supply chain transparency and traceability and to better manage supplier risk. Research and development will be supported by a 800,000 SEK grant (approximately $92,000) that was recently awarded to Kodiak Rating by Vinnova, a federal agency under Sweden’s Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation.

3 Essential Factors to Facilitating Supply Chain Finance Adoption With Suppliers

finance

As general awareness about dynamic discounting and supply chain finance grows among practitioners, procurement groups are increasingly pushing their technology providers to offer early payment capabilities. These organizations are primarily seeking to strengthen their supply base, relieving the DPO stretch that has plagued small suppliers as of late while also improving their own working capital.

But while enthusiasm for such programs has grown with buying organizations and their technology providers, suppliers have been the reluctant missing piece to the early payment puzzle. To encourage the full spectrum of suppliers to fully adopt early payment, the parties offering these programs must team up explain the benefits in the supplier’s language, providing a seamless, flexible and fast experience that creates win-win scenarios for everyone involved.

Building the Business Case for SRM (Part 4): Reducing Supplier Risk

risk

Spend Matters welcomes this guest series from Sean Harley, co-founder and CEO of LUPR.

In this post in our series on developing the business case for investing in supplier relationship management (SRM) capabilities, we focus on reducing supplier risk. Supplier qualification (SQ), a subcomponent of SRM, enables your organization to identify suppliers with weak quality management processes, thereby minimizing your exposure to supplier noncompliance with safety, insurance, environmental and security requirements. In addition, SQ facilitates root cause analysis with suppliers performing poorly.