The Supply Risk Category

How to Minimize Exposure Risk in a Global Food Supply Chain

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Megan Ray Nichols, a freelance writer covering STEM topics.

We all live in a global society now — a reality that includes, to a greater extent each year, our entire world’s food supply chains. If you and your business represent some of the critical pieces in this vast and interconnected ecosystem, you need to know you’re doing everything possible to insulate yourself, your product and, perhaps most critically of all, your end users from all types of risk that may introduce themselves along the way.

Resilinc EventWatch Data: Factory Fires and M&A Activity Rank as Top Disruptive Events

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Resilinc recently released its 2017 EventWatch Supply Chain Disruption Annual Report, and the top two disruptive event types by a significant margin were factory fires and explosions and mergers and acquisitions. The report is based off the 2017 data collected by Resilinc’s EventWatch software, which monitors and analyzes global events that are potentially disruptive for supply chains and then alerts customers. In 2017, EventWatch published on average five bulletins a day.

What the Super Bowl Can Teach About Risk Management

Pause for a moment to consider how adept the NFL has proven itself at proactively addressing logistics and risk management. Whether we’re talking facilities, security, transportation or emergency services, there’s obviously a lot more behind the curtain than we know about. Suffice it to say that little imagination is required to accept that the NFL sets an interesting, if not teachable, example — not just in terms of how to pull off a mega-event but how to react to most anything that could possibly go wrong. It expects problems and is prepared for them.

U.S. Companies are Rethinking Risk Management Strategy After the 2017 Hurricanes

For many large U.S.-based companies, last year’s hurricanes and the damage they brought have been a wake-up call. A survey of senior financial executives at U.S.-based companies with revenues of more than $1 billion, commissioned by FM Global, revealed that the hurricanes have prompted 68% to adapt their risk management strategy for the future.

The 12 Supply Risk Management Disconnects that Destroy Value (Part 1) [PRO]

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“Risk” and “risk management” are terms that are like the ultimate Rorschach test in business: they mean many different things to many people. The same applies to the term “value” — and don’t even bring up “supply management.” Even a specific term like “supply risk” has many interpretations (e.g., it’s much more than supplier risk). The problem with this is that if people within a company define various terms differently, then how well will they be collectively managing those areas? Likely not well at all.

Risk management is a strange animal. On one hand, it focuses on “things gone wrong” and hones in on defining and mitigating various external risks that create adverse events in a value chain. On the other hand, those adverse events affect stakeholder-relevant performance (i.e., measurable value). Such performance and value delivery is focused on “things gone right” and reward rather than risk.

The key, therefore, is to realize that risk and reward are inextricably linked. If ensuring delivered value (and improving it over time) from the supply chain and from suppliers is what supply management is all about, then that supply value should not only be expected (i.e., expected value like discussed above) but also protected (i.e., protected value ensured through supply risk management). As a side note, have you ever considered that the concept of “expected value” uses the term “value” even though it is applied heavily to the world of risk management (i.e., calculating the expected probabilities and impacts of various risks)?

Anyway, the imperative becomes ensuring that the most important performance metrics (i.e., KPIs) are protected from risk. Yet these individual KPIs are rarely individually and systematically managed for risk, and the lack of risk-adjusted performance management means that you’re going to be exposed and it will catch up with you eventually. The problem isn’t just bouncing around and applying risk management technique X via tool Y to address risk type Z. There are a dozen fundamental disconnects in most firms that prevent risk management being properly resourced, aligned, managed and improved. Only by unpacking them and addressing them through focused practical interventions can you really get to the root cause issues that are likely keeping your supply risk management efforts suboptimized.

In this Spend Matter PRO series, we will explore 12 critical supply risk management disconnects. This brief, Part 1, focuses on the following four areas:

  1. Risk Scope and Stakeholders
  2. Performance vs. Risk
  3. Risk Type vs. Impact
  4. Risk vs. Cost (e.g., “cost of risk”)
If you’re a practitioner, you should be able to see which disconnects are the biggest issues for you and make yourself more resilient (i.e., ability to mitigate and recover from risks) and predictably high performing. If you’re a consulting organization, you’ll probably find some pointers to improve any methodologies that you have here. And if you’re solution provider, whether in the supply risk management area, or more broadly, you’ll hopefully get some ideas on how to address more strategic pain points.

Trends in Cybersecurity Risks: Will 2018 See More Indirect Supply Chain Attacks?

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2018 may be the year we see more indirect supply chain attacks and compromised industrial control systems, according to a new report from consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton on trends in cybersecurity risks. In “Foresights 2018,” the report authors outlined nine predictions on what may happen in the world of cybersecurity this year, from outsourced hacking to supply chain infiltration and cryptocurrency theft. We’ll look at a few of these predictions in this post.

Hurricanes, Geopolitics, Cyberattacks and More: Top Risk Posts of 2017

As far as risk goes, if 2016 was characterized by political turbulence, then 2017 was all about disasters, natural and manmade. This past May saw a worldwide ransomware attack that hit more tha 300,000 computers in 150 countries, disrupted hospitals and manufacturing plants, and caused economic losses that are estimated to be in the billions. Then there were the Harvey and Irma hurricanes of late summer and the ongoing California wildfires. And we haven’t even mentioned geopolitics, commodities, finances and all of the other risks out there that need to be on procurement’s radar these days. As part of Spend Matters’ year in review, here are the top risk posts from 2017 that you don’t want to miss.

Creating a Successful Third-Party Risk Management Strategy: What You Need to Know

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It’s almost 2018 and time to think about updating — or creating — your risk management program for next year. Financial health ratings firm RapidRatings recently held a webinar on the most important factors to consider as you plan your risk strategy. Presented by Brian Sica, director of sales operations at RapidRatings, “Developing a Third-Party Risk Management Strategy for 2018” takes a broad approach to the topic, starting with alignment to business objectives before progressing to the actual planning and execution of the program.

Commodity Price Risk Management: For the Many, Not the Few

Spend Matters welcomes this guest post from Tom Lawrence, director at Flow&Ebb. 

Commodity markets affect us all. Wild swings in commodity prices affect how much we pay for groceries, how much we pay for aluminum cans for our organic soda, how much we pay for electricity. Yet traditionally only large businesses had the budgets to pay for, and enough clout to embed, commodity price risk management into their supply management strategy.

What are Companies’ Biggest Risk Misconceptions? A Conversation with Coupa Economist Ahmad Sadeddin (Part 2)

As a senior economist and risk expert at Coupa, Ahmad Sadeddin is in a good position to see what companies do well and not so well in terms of risk management. Unfortunately, companies are being put to the test more frequently these days, as risks become more numerous and unpredictable. In this second half of our pre-webinar interview with Sadeddin, the risk expert discusses common risk-related misconceptions, challenges that Coupa’s clients have faced and one recent risk success story that impressed him.

Successes, Failures, Worries: Coupa Economist Ahmad Sadeddin on All Things Risk Related (Part 1)

Are companies paying more attention to risk as they become more sophisticated, or are risks so numerous nowadays that risk management has become a bigger priority? If news headlines are any indication, we are all in need of a few contingency plans. And if you — as a business or as an individual — don’t even know where to start, well, you’re not alone. From hurricanes and earthquakes to Brexit and the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), what is one supposed to look at first?

Dr. Edward Altman and CreditRiskMonitor CEO Jerry Flum on the Looming Corporate Debt Crisis

Debt is a growing problem, both in the U.S. specifically and worldwide. As the Congressional Budget Office announced earlier this year, U.S. debt held by the public is projected to reach 150% of GDP by 2047. Currently, the $19.9 trillion of U.S. public debt equates to about 107% of GDP, according to the Pew Research Center. In short, there’s a mammoth debt problem, which was the title of a webinar that CreditRiskMonitor recently hosted on this very topic.