The World Trade Category

Navigating Uncertainty: Pool4Tool’s Roger Blumberg on Where Manufacturing Procurement Technology is Headed

Toyota supply chain

Last week we featured a new interview series focused on the technology renaissance coming to direct materials procurement. In collaboration with our sister site MetalMiner, Spend Matters Founder Jason Busch questioned procurement technology leaders and experts on the reasons this renaissance has begun, as well as how procurement and supply chain professionals are using technology to navigate volatile global trade trends. This interview features Roger Blumberg, chief commercial officer at Pool4Tool, which works with leading manufacturers such as Miele, Swiss Steel and Tower Automotive.

Ethiopia’s Apparel Sector Beset By Land Disputes and Labor Risks, New Research Finds

apparel

As a sourcing destination for apparel companies, Ethiopia can hardly be called up-and-coming anymore. Since 2013, East Africa — and Ethiopia in particular — has been on the radar of apparel companies seeking low-cost manufacturing labor. New research from global risk consulting firm Verisk Maplecroft, however, suggests that Ethiopia’s apparel sector is likely to face significant risks in the near future, from land disputes to human rights concerns to political protests and instability.

Where is Manufacturing Procurement Technology Headed? An Interview with Keith Baranowski, Global Vice President and GM, Direct Materials Sourcing, SAP Ariba

manufacturing

Our sister site MetalMiner recently started a series of interviews with a range of experts at technology vendors. This interview features Keith Baranowski, global vice president and GM, Direct Materials Sourcing, SAP Ariba, which works with leading manufacturers such as Ford, Microsoft and Johnson & Johnson.

Where Manufacturing Procurement Technology is Headed: A New Interview Series

manufacturing

Why have procurement technology vendors initiated a “direct procurement” renaissance, and what changes within manufacturers have started to make this possible? This line of questioning forms the backbone of a new interview series over on our sister site MetalMiner, in which Spend Matters Founder Jason Busch questions multiple experts at technology vendors on these and related topics.

Week in Metals: New Steel Imports Probe Will Be Based on National Security

Chinese demand

Another investigation and analysis of cheap steel imports coming to the U.S. was ordered yesterday by President Donald Trump. The Commerce Department will recommend to Trump whether or not to invoke Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, an action that would treat dumped steel imports as a threat to national security. The Week in Metals brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news from our sister site MetalMiner.

The Week in Metals: Administrative Review Hikes South Korean OCTG Duties

cargo theft

This week, the Department of Commerce announced in a press release that it is exercising its authority under Congress for the first time to address market distortions in the production of foreign merchandise, particularly oil country tubular goods (steel pipes and supporting sections) from the Republic of Korea. Administrative review allows Commerce to calculate dumping margins that “more accurately account for the unfair pricing practices of foreign exporters.” The Week in Metals brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news from our sister site MetalMiner.

The Week in Metals: China Hongqiao May be the Canary in Chinese Aluminum’s Coal Mine

steel

The largest aluminum producer in the People’s Republic, China Hongqiao, suddenly finds itself on the hot seat. China’s traditionally opaque reporting structure has allowed some firms to present their results in a less-than-honest way, and auditor Ernst & Young has flagged its client as needing more review. The Week in Metals brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news from our sister site MetalMiner.

The Week in Metals: We Hardly Knew Ye, EPA Clean Power Plan

The Trump Administration sent the EPA Clean Power Plan back for review this week, all but assuring its bureaucratic death. It was never implemented after a court challenge, and the administration will likely scrap it altogether since it has gone or record opposing its limitations on industry. The steel industry, among others, applauded its death. We also report on a recent conference where one of the best-attended seminars was about value-added products offered by successful service centers. The Week in Metals brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news from our sister site MetalMiner.

The Week in Metals: More Defense Spending, Less Regulation of… Pretty Much Everything

river

President Trump’s $1.1 trillion budget blueprint released Thursday proposes dramatic cuts to the State Department and the Environmental Protection Agency while seeking billions more for defense issues and $1.5 billion for the president’s proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall. Noted trade attorney Alan Price, of the Washington law firm Wiley Rein, said the World Trade Organization case that the federal government filed in January on behalf of aluminum producers will essentially serve as a guide for other industries looking to challenge state-subsidized companies’ overproduction for export in the People’s Republic. The Week in Metals brings you the latest procurement and supply chain news from our sister site MetalMiner.

Where to Find Sustainably and Ethically Made Apparel? Ask Project JUST

retail

Last month, I came across an article on Medium about Ivanka Trump’s fashion line and a group of six researchers’ attempt to unravel the supply chain behind the apparel. Sure, the fact that she is the daughter of President Donald Trump may have given the matter its newsworthiness — after all, plenty of celebrities lend their names to clothing lines — but I was curious whether Ivanka’s “women who work” platform extended to employees farther down the supply chain. Do women’s rights to, say, maternity leave, apply to the female factory worker sewing dresses in China or Indonesia — or just to the women buying those dresses?

The Week in Metals: Yes, The Mexican Border Wall is Happening

Not only is the Trump administration asking for bids for its promised southern border wall, but the Department of Homeland Security has also added specifications to its request for proposals. The Dakota Access Pipeline can continue construction of the final eight miles of the project underneath Lake Oahe in North Dakota, a federal judge ruled this week. The Week in Metals brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news from MetalMiner.

Dispatches from Cuba (Part 2): On Transactions and the Cuban Supply Chain

Cuba

Ginny Smith presents live science shows to schools, science festivals and other groups, and is also an author, journalist, radio and film presenter. As well as science, travel is another love, and as a neuroscientist by training, she is interested in the psychology of negotiation, which she discussed in her previous article about her recent trip to Cuba. In Part 2, she looks at queuing psychology, and touches on Cuban supply chain issues, too!

It wasn’t just navigating taxis that was a challenge in Cuba — shopping was a fascinating experience, as well. While it is often said that the English form the best queues in the world, I would disagree — the Cuban system is far better. When entering somewhere like a bank, you may think there is no queue at all, just one person at each desk and a number of others hanging around, sitting on sofas, chatting.