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Supplier Management

Beyond Supplier Risk Management: How Procurement Can Take a Leadership Role in Enterprise Risk Management (Part 3) — Integrating Supply Risk Management into Day-to-Day Procurement [PRO]

In our previous installments of this Spend Matters PRO supply risk series, we discussed an exhaustive list of strategies for using supply risk as a way to align procurement and the enterprise to safely extract more value from spend/supply. In this installment, we are going to dive more deeply into aligning supply risk within the source-to-pay (S2P) processes themselves.

Too often, supply risk management is weakly addressed within S2P, and by using some of the alignment techniques discussed in Part 2 of the series, procurement can align supply risk systematically into its own methodology and processes.

Supplier Management: Dozens of Markets in One (Market Introduction) [PRO]

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The supplier management technology and services market is one of the broadest, most complex and mysterious to those who try to make sense of it — and take advantage of the many solutions that it offers. Spend Matters tracks well over 100 providers in this market, and they fall into more than a dozen individual areas. Some vendors and services firms offer solutions that address multiple components, but not a single provider comes close to offering a comprehensive solution.

This Spend Matters PRO Research brief explains and segments the supplier management market into five solution categories: core supplier process and data enablement; supplier and supply chain risk; community/network; supplier and worker/contractor; and disruptive enablement.

AdaptOne: Vendor Snapshot (Part 3) — Summary and Competitive Analysis [PRO]

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The supplier management technology market is among the most fragmented of those in the procurement technology landscape.

It comprises multiple segments (and sub-segments), and Spend Matters now tracks approximately 50 providers that compete within niche segments of it. One of these providers is AdaptOne, a vendor specializing in supplier information management that perfectly matches Spend Matters’ SolutionMap “Turnkey” persona for supplier management. This Spend Matters PRO report provides facts and expert analysis to help procurement organizations make informed decisions about AdaptOne’s solution — and whether its “turnkey” services-driven approach is right for them.

Part 1 of our analysis provided a company background and detailed solution overview, as well as a summary recommended fit suggestion for when organizations should consider AdaptOne in the procurement, supply chain and finance technology areas. Part 2 covered product strengths and weaknesses. This final installment offers SWOT analysis, explores competitive alternatives to AdaptOne and provides insight into evaluation and selection considerations, including a prioritization/fit checklist.

Direct Material Sourcing and Supplier Management Platforms (Part 1) [Plus +]

In enabling basic strategic sourcing capability for indirect, services and basic direct materials spend, there are now a lot — and we mean it — of solid choices in the market. And it’s a space that’s getting more crowded everyday. Yet in comparison to the broader sourcing marketplace, the direct materials market is, unfortunately, given short shrift. There are potentially many reasons for this. First, it’s complex — there is not one category of solution. Second, the user for these tools is not always the same as one who might use a more generic sourcing toolset (at least not alone). And third, the processes that direct materials sourcing toolsets support are complicated because they are used not only across numerous internal functions (materials management, plant management, operations, supply chain, design/engineering, procurement, sales and operations planning, etc.), but span multiple tiers of suppliers.

In a three-part Spend Matters Plus series that will deliver a cursory attempt to segment this market, we’ll attempt to overcome the current lack of research in this area by providing a concrete segmentation of different technology categories and the capabilities within each. Today we’ll consider additional context and provide a high-level segmentation and explanation of tools (which we’ll flesh out and provide vendor short-lists for later in the analysis).

Offsets, Local Content and Supplier Information Management (Part 2) [Plus +]

We wrote in Part 1 about offsets in the defence industry, and the commonality they have with wider issues around “local content” — using procurement and supply chain activities to show support for building capability and capacity in local economies and supply chains, often as a lever to win contracts, concessions (e.g., mining) or similar.

So bringing this back to practical considerations, what can we learn, and how can organisations position themselves successfully in this field? That’s important because the need for organisations to show how they are impacting and benefitting local, regional or national economies is only going to increase in our view. That’s particularly true for firms who wish to trade and work internationally, particularly in the developing world. And looking at the growth rates in Africa, South America and the emerging parts of Asia, these are markets in which more and more Western firms will want to operate.

Offsets, Local Content, and Supplier Information Management [Plus +]

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The principle of offsets is this: assume a country doesn’t have its own indigenous capacity or capability to manufacture, say, fighter aircraft, so they obviously have to buy from foreign suppliers. But the government making the purchase will (not unreasonably) wish some of that purchase price to be re-invested back into their country.

Building the Business Case for Managing Suppliers With Technology: 7 ROI Levers (Part 2 — Supply Risk Management) [PRO]

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Thus far in this series we have examined six levers procurement organizations can pull, both at the front-end of the supplier lifecycle and those in the active phase of supplier management, to build a business case for managing suppliers with technology. In the case of the former, we focused on business case components for supplier search and discovery, supplier onboarding, and supplier enablement. In the latter, we examined contract compliance and enforcement, compliance and credentialing, and supplier performance management.

All of these areas can form core components of a supplier management business case. But on a standalone basis, thousands of global companies have already invested in data sources, specialized software or a combination of the two to monitor at least certain elements of supplier risk outside of these other supplier management areas. Indeed, of the seven levers organizations can pull in building a business case for managing suppliers through technology, supplier risk management — and broader supply risk management — is the one that is often most put to use.

In today’s installment, we zero in on the seventh supplier management business case lever, introducing business case and enabling technology considerations for supplier risk management. We discuss select solution components within this area, as well as high-level ROI considerations. Later in the series, we will provide more detailed ROI model inputs and ranges procurement teams can use in building a business case in each of these areas.

Spend Matters PRO clients can also contact their client services representative for an interactive Excel-based ROI model that can serve as the basis for building supplier management business cases.

Building the Business Case for Managing Suppliers With Technology: 7 ROI Levers (Part 1 — Active Supplier Management) [PRO]

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The return on investment (ROI) for supplier management does not have to be nebulous. With limited effort, procurement organizations can build a compelling business case for supplier management either as a component of broader source-to-pay implementations or on a standalone basis, as well as to develop specific KPIs to measure overall program savings and ongoing cost avoidance.

In the first two installments of this series, we introduce the primary ROI levers of supplier management technology initiatives. Our introduction to the topic explored the three levers at the front-end of the supplier lifecycle that can form the foundation of a business case. Today we continue our exploration of the seven primary ROI levers, with an emphasis on those in the “active” phase of supplier management efforts. These include contract compliance and enforcement, compliance and credentialing, and performance and risk management. Later in the series, we will provide more detailed ROI model inputs and ranges procurement teams can use in building a business case in each of these areas.

When you’ve got your supplier management business case ready, check out the latest Spend Matters Supplier Management SolutionMap to see how supplier management solutions such as Aravo, ConnXus, Determine, GEP, HICX, Ivalua, Jaggaer, SAP Ariba, State of Flux, SynerTrade and Zycus stack up in each of the areas we pinpoint as savings levers.

Spend Matters PRO practitioner clients can also contact their client services representative for an interactive Excel-based ROI model which can serve as one of the basis for building supplier management business cases.

Building the Business Case for Managing Suppliers with Technology: 7 ROI Levers (Introduction) [PRO]

If Rodney Dangerfield had ever worked in procurement, he would have been in charge of supplier management. While supplier management does get some respect, the late Dangerfield certainly would have agreed it does not get the respect it deserves.

Part of the challenge in garnering respect for supplier management is that it touches on so many workstreams, processes and business functions. And we’ve got to say, it’s also not as sexy as spend analytics, strategic sourcing, contract management or even spend management. Compounding these challenges is that few procurement, finance and shared services organizations have earnestly attempted to develop a business case and ROI model for investing in supplier management on an end-to-end basis. But trust us: If you do, you’ll run (not walk) to doing it right.

This Spend Matters PRO research series aims to both demystify the business benefits of doing supplier management “right” and help organizations build a business case to invest in supplier management processes, as well as supporting software. It also explores the ROI drivers organizations might consider in creating their own business case for rolling out a supplier management solution or building on investments they’ve already made.

In the first two installments of this series, we introduce the primary ROI levers of supplier management, starting first with those at the front end of the supplier lifecycle that can help with building a business case. Later in the series, we will provide more detailed ROI model inputs and ranges that can be used in building a business case in each of these areas.

Spend Matters PRO clients can also contact their client services representative for an interactive Excel-based ROI model that can serve as the basis for building supplier management business cases.

A Different Sort of Influence: 16 Areas Where Supplier Management Can Help Engage Your Stakeholders Strategically (Part 1) [Plus +]

Supplier management is too often an afterthought in the eyes of procurement and its stakeholders. Yes, it's important to collect supplier qualification information through the sourcing and onboarding process, and then also monitor the suppliers against their contracts to get what you paid for and to reduce supply risk. But shouldn’t there be more to supplier management?

Progressive organizations are beginning to use supplier management (and third-party management more broadly) as a better overall governance structure for how to best externalize the enterprise. This is especially true as supply markets get digitized (and disrupted) and supplier innovation can be brought to bear beyond cost/spend savings.

“Innovation management” is indeed one of the areas where a supplier management approach can help procurement influence stakeholders, but there are 15 other ways, as well. Having a broader palette of value creation (for which we’ll discuss six major value streams) will not only help improve spend influence but also improve the quality of influence to help elevate procurement’s value proposition.

Supplier Onboarding: Implementation Tips and Key Recommendations (Part 3) [Plus +]

So far in our PRO series exploring the nuances of setting up a supplier onboarding program we’ve delved into many specific steps and elements necessary to implement an effective process. Yet achieving a level of program certainty around these recommendations and plans is not realistic prior to engaging with a solution provider – unless you are prepared to pay separately for the provider to go through the scoping and delivery documentation as an independent engagement (which can be a smart approach, and probably something that you can get at least partial credit for if you award the solution business later on).

Supplier Onboarding: Linking Design With Action (Part 2) [Plus +]

You’ve defined a strategy for supplier onboarding and given full consideration to all of the elements that make your requirements unique. You’ve fully considered which internal stakeholders besides procurement need to be included in the process of supplier onboarding and management. And you’ve mapped specific initiatives to onboarding requirements. But now it’s time to define specific supplier onboarding workflows, fully linking design with action.