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Supplier Management

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 3) [Plus +]

Perhaps the most important element that supplier diversity professionals should incorporate into their program management efforts is how to constantly incorporate general procurement efforts within their own. Working with general procurement should be the top priority for diversity teams. All too often, the trap for supplier diversity professionals is to lead a silo-based activity with few touch-points with general procurement.

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 2) [Plus +]

For outcomes, whether you get preferred delivery, higher quality, better post-sales support, more favorable warranties or better pricing based on prompt payments as a result of getting diverse suppliers paid faster than the norm, it is important to consider the need to engage the broader finance organization (e.g., AP) and even other functions to implement a program successfully. And try to broaden your vision and go outside the standard procurement playbook in the process.

Supplier Diversity Meets Supply Management: A Roadmap for Success (Part 1) [Plus +]

suppliers

There are few areas within the walls of corporate America that stir up emotions and opinions like supplier diversity. Regardless of where you stand regarding supplier diversity programs and how supplier diversity can be done right — because it can definitely be done poorly, even catastrophically so — this research brief is meant to serve as a general primer for procurement professionals needing to bring supplier diversity into their daily activities across the supply management function. We also hope it will prove useful for newly appointed supplier diversity managers and for senior procurement managers and corporate directors wanting to understand how supplier diversity fits in with their business, day to day and strategically. Our intention is to help you make the business case not just for greater investment in diversity programs but for the right programs to begin with. 

Freeing Yourself From the Chains of the DPO Stretch: An Empirical and Experiential Analysis [Plus +]

Before on Spend Matters, I highlighted an analysis where, in 12 of 14 manufacturing industries I analyzed, I found negative correlations between Days Payable Outstanding (DPO) and enterprise performance (e.g., debt you may incur to raise cash to invest in high payback initiatives such as B2B trade financing where early payment discounts and/or supply chain finance programs are established). In this Spend Matters Plus article, I’ll dive into the industry details and also provide some additional insights based on some research that we conducted with the Institute for Supply Management (ISM).

CRM for Procurement: Lessons from the Sell Side [Plus +]

In a world where everything is quickly becoming a service (XaaS), perhaps the single most important differentiator is being customer-focused and aligned in order to allow you to deliver value to them over the long run. It is a simple principle, but procurement is not so easy to implement. Everybody who spends money in the enterprise has the potential to get more value from their spend and is a potential “customer” for procurement to help. Given procurement’s limited resources, adopting and adapting CRM principles, practices, and tools can help. As we get started, note that CRM for “supply” and suppliers is not the buy-side of “SRM” or supplier management – it’s a much bigger, hairier, and more encompassing beast.

So who are the customers? And should they even be called customers?

Many procurement organizations do not like the term “customers.” Some use the term “clients,” and others use the term “stakeholders.” Still others use the term “internal partners.” It doesn't really matter as long as the organization defines the nomenclature that works best for them. That said, it is important to understand who all the various stakeholders are within the procurement process, so that they can be appropriately targeted to drive more value out of the process. In fact, if you think of the term "stakeholders," it means anyone who has a stake in the process and who consumes the outputs of that process: information, materials, services, cash, goodwill, etc.

So, to be a stakeholder in a procurement process means to be a customer of that process. This means that procurement needs to be explicit in defining and working with 10 key stakeholders – and reconciling which of these will get the most attention.

Let’s get to the list (and beyond that, 14 critical areas of CRM begging to be addressed).

BravoConnect Dispatch: Exploring the Four Pillars of BravoSolution’s Strategy

Yesterday at BravoConnect 2016, BravoSolution shared a vision for its product strategy, product development and network-based initiatives (see our initial coverage on these areas here: […]

Top 50 Supplier Innovation Case Studies: Nos. 41–50, Softbank to Xerox [Plus +]

innovation

This is the fifth and final installment of our supplier innovation case study series where we help answer the question, “What are other procurement organizations doing in supplier innovation?” We’ve curated a “Top 50” list of some of the best case studies highlighting supplier innovation from a select group of major firms. We looked at the innovations in question, the results, the related suppliers and some key takeaway lessons. In this installment, we’ll look at Softbank, Toyota, Vodafone, Whirlpool, Xerox and more.

Top 50 Supplier Innovation Case Studies: Nos. 31-40, P&G to Siemens [Plus +]

lightbulb

This is the fourth installment of our supplier innovation case study series where we help answer the question, “What are other procurement organizations doing in supplier innovation?” We’ve curated a “Top 50” list of some of the best case studies highlighting supplier innovation from a select group of major firms. We looked at the innovations in question, the results, the related suppliers and some key takeaway lessons. In this installment, we’ll look at P&G, Pratt & Whitney, Proxiumus, Roche, Samsung and more.

Top 50 Supplier Innovation Case Studies: Nos. 21-30, IBM to Nokia [Plus +]

InnoCentive

This is the third installment of our supplier innovation case study series where we help answer the question, “What are other procurement organizations doing in supplier innovation?” We’ve curated a “Top 50” list of some of the best case studies highlighting supplier innovation from a select group of major firms. We looked at the innovations in question, the results, the related suppliers and some key takeaway lessons. In this installment, we’ll look at IBM, Kraft, L’Oreal, Mars, NOKIA and more.

Top 50 Supplier Innovation Case Studies: Nos. 11-19, Electrolux to Honda [Plus +]

finger sliding innovation ticker

This is the second installment of our supplier innovation case study series where we help answer the question, “What are other procurement organizations doing in supplier innovation”? We’ve curated a “Top 50” list of some of the best case studies highlighting supplier innovation from a select group of major firms. We looked at the innovations in question, the results, the related suppliers (if disclosed), and some key takeaway lessons. In Part One, we highlighted how Apple and TSMC teamed up to provide more cutting-edge technology in the iPhone; how Campbell Soup Company lightened their shipment load; and how Dell leverages an all-important C-word, communication, to learn directly from their customers how to best work with suppliers. In this installment, we’ll look at Electrolux, Eli Lilly, Ford, General Mills, Honda and more.

Top 50 Supplier Innovation Case Studies: Nos. 1-10, Apple Inc. to Diageo [Plus +]

Here at Spend Matters, we try to provide procurement practitioners with not only some of the latest insights, analysis, and opinions on everything ‘buy-side’, but also with some time-saving strategies, techniques, and tools they can use to increase efficiency and add more value. One of the questions we often get from more advanced procurement organizations is “what are other procurement organizations doing in [more strategic areas such as] supplier innovation”? For those of you who have the same question (and related sub-questions), but don’t have the money to pay for a high-end peer networking group, we’ve decided to do some legwork for you and curate a “Top 50” list of some of the best case studies highlighting supplier innovation from a select group of major firms (and not just P&G!). We broke down each case study by firm, the supplier(s) at play, the innovation in question, the summarized results of the study, and key takeaway lessons. Each Plus installment in the series spotlights case studies on 10 firms, and in our kickoff we look at Apple, Boeing, Campbell Soup, Dell and more. Let’s begin...

Defining Your Solution Approach: Supplier Management 101 (Part 3) [Plus +]

supplier management

In Part 1 of this series, we introduced supplier management from a process and methodology standpoint before mapping it to various solution areas that are out in the marketplace. Supplier management often is called SLM because of its lifecycle focus, which spans initial analysis (analysis and opportunity identification), planning (sourcing), negotiation (contract management) and execution (performance), and closes the process loop by leading back to the analysis phase of the strategic sourcing cycle as a result of future opportunity identification. Third-party management (3PM), which deals with non-suppliers that are also critical to your organization — such as government agencies, third-party logistics, partners and (media) agencies — is simply the application of the appropriate finely-tuned subset of supplier management capabilities to the third party that needs to be managed for organizational success. And, of course, you also need good supplier information. In this installment we cover what is in scope from a process and information standpoint before mapping to solution categories that are available in the market.