Procurement News from Spend Matters US – Weekly Round-Up

In case you haven’t yet heard, Jason will be joining you all in the UK in just three short days! In preparation for the Great Sourcing Debate (please let Jason or Peter know if you’d like to attend, space is limited), we’ve been heavily training him here in the office on “Oxford Style Debate”:

Ok, down to business. While at SciQuest’s Next Level event last week, Jason sat down with Gamble Heffernan, who runs marketing and strategy and is leading the AECsoft integration planning and joint product roadmap effort. Check out his series of posts (Part 1 and Part 2) examining what exactly this acquisition means for SciQuest and where they’re headed in the future.

Some other interesting news that came as a result of Next Level is how Stanford University was able to drive compliance and enablement in a P2P platform, even getting lazy and fussy “academics” on board: (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3).

Some bits and pieces:

Dr. Patrick Moore, Chief Scientist of Greenspirit Strategies Ltd provided us with quite an interesting guest post: Certification Today: If a Tree Falls in a Forest and it’s not Certified... -- “According to the United Nations, only 0.5 percent of the vast African and Asian forests and only 1.6 percent of forests in Latin America are certified. There are many reasons why sub-tropical and tropical forests have had difficulty obtaining certification. Forest certification is quite costly. Some of these forests (although by no means all) may be badly managed and would require substantial investment to bring them in line with forests in North America and Western Europe.”

China Sourcing: Be VERY Careful How You Measure Savings -- “Even after all these years of the global sourcing evolution and rising China prices, I still can't believe what I read from some consultants when it comes to on-the-ground savings numbers in the manufacturing area. Take a recent post over on Procurement Leaders Blog by Paul Teague. In it, Paul interviews a consultant that suggests in China that the 65-80% savings were "once common" has now dropped to "35-50%" in certain product categories. In looking at numbers of this, we should all stop and pause for a moment.”

Finally, one last video we put together about International Trade Breaking Point, just two weeks away. Register to watch the live simulcast!

- Sheena Moore

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