Procurement Recruitment Advice: Updating Your CV

Spend Matters is pleased to bring you a timely series of recruitment advisory posts from Edbury Daley, the leading specialist procurement recruiter, on how to prepare if you are looking for a change or move in the profession in the New Year. Over the coming days we will be featuring a new post on each working day to help you make the right decisions. 

The Christmas holidays and early January are traditionally times when people reflect on the previous year and begin to think about a potential job move. Recent research indicates that many people will use their new electronic devices to start looking for a job from Boxing Day onwards.

If this applies to you then our series of articles in association with Spend Matters will be invaluable. We’ll look at what you can do to enhance your chances of finding an exciting career opportunity that is right for you in 2015.  We’ll cover key issues like how to plan your job search and criteria for a move.  We’ll also advise you on how to use your own network and select which recruiters you will work with.

It’s important to note that a number of factors make January a time when recruitment activity rises. They include the emotional factor of seeing in a new calendar year and contemplating what the future may hold ... but in addition there are sound financial reasons why the early part of the year is a busy one for job moves.

Many people receive their annual bonus payments in the first quarter of the year, so this is a factor in terms of when they want to resign from their current position. Evidence also indicates that many organisations begin to recruit as their business plans and headcount budgets are confirmed early in the calendar year.  This fuels a rise in both advertising and recruitment activity in general.

So it’s going to be a competitive market, whether you are hiring the best available talent or trying to find an exciting new role.  We hope our advice will help you achieve your goals in 2015.

Updating your CV

There are many varying viewpoints on what constitutes a good CV. It is actually very subjective and CV formats vary from sector to sector and across different job functions.

It is often recommended that you should tailor your CV for every role you apply for and whilst this is good advice it can be very time-consuming and not practical if you are in a busy job. An alternative therefore is to think carefully about your key strengths and achievements and create a general document that promotes your best skills and experience. Then you merely need to highlight the skills and experience important for each role rather than a comprehensive review each time.

Focus on the skills, knowledge and competencies that are strengths or those that you enjoy and want to highlight to develop in your next role.  The CV is effectively your advert so make it the best you can and use it for all roles. Get feedback from others before you send it out. Make sure that the first page gets across all the key points you wish to highlight - it is true that unless a reviewer finds something interesting on the first page they will rarely read the rest.

Don’t do a long list of responsibilities or just repeat your job description - it is boring and frankly people will assume you are an average candidate. Reviewers look for clarity and relevant experience and the transferable skills you can offer a new employer and want to use/develop in new role

Yes, describe the roles you undertook but make it  brief and make certain you show what problems you solved and how.  Companies want to hire people who can change things, improve results, develop teams or improve processes so you need to show you can do this.

Also be careful not to use too much internal jargon. Most organisations have their own structures and terminology but think what people outside may or may not understand. Often a junior HR person may be sifting the CV first - will they know what SRM means for example?

You may also find Edbury Daley's recent analysis of the job market helpful in your decision making -- you can find it here

And if you have a few seconds to answer a short multiple-choice survey, you could help Edbury Daley  in its timely new research on recruitment choice and selection methods.  You can take part here 

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