Where have all the (procurement and music) Mavericks gone?

The media reviews of the Brit Awards show last night have been a little grudging this morning. Yes, most of them say, it was very professional. Yes, it’s great to see British acts as varied as One Direction, Mumford and Sons and Emilie Sandé, all doing well in the US and indeed globally.  But, they say, wasn’t it all a little dull and predictable? Where’s the excitement, the danger, the passion?

I was lucky enough to get a late invitation to the event, in the ordinary seats, not down on the floor at the dinner tables I should say, but it was still a very enjoyable evening. I don't know what the sponsorship cost Mastercard, but the staging and production was really impressive, right from the moment Muse opened the show. They were the most viscerally exciting act of the night, and arguably the only real “rock” act as well.

And yes, by the end, we were hoping there might be a “moment” – remembering Jarvis Cocker pulling his trousers down – just to liven things up a bit!  Robbie Williams and Justin Timberlake for instance now both look like sleek and successful software CEOs doing a brilliantly choreographed karaoke at their firms’ annual conferences rather than “rock stars”.

One issue perhaps is that the new breed of music stars all seem to be so nice, hard working, conscientious, humble even. OK, there’s s till a bit of drinking and chasing the opposite sex from the likes of One Direction, but compared to the sixties, or the punk era... it is all very polite.

Which got me thinking about mavericks – in music, and in business, including procurement.

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