World Trade Content

Afternoon Coffee: Magnus advises procurement tech vendors on breaking into U.S. market; USMCA approved by Senate

Spend Matters’ analyst Magnus Bergfors is our VP of European Research, and he’s based in Sweden. So he knows the European market. He also knows the U.S. market, and in a post on Spend Matters Europe, he shares what it takes to make it here. In other news, the Senate approves the USMCA trade deal; the latest employment numbers show fewer jobs were posted; U.S. federal deficit hits $1 trillion; and President Donald Trump adds legal heavyweights to his impeachment trial that's underway. Afternoon Coffee: Rounding out the week with a jolt of news.

Afternoon Coffee: Tradeshift restructuring; Is ‘New Law’ like Atrium disrupting itself?; U.S. won’t label China a currency manipulator; Shelby Group funding

Tradeshift announces a $240 million funding round, and CEO Christian Lanng talks to Spend Matters about the details, strategy and the future. Read the full interview here. In other news, China won't be labeled a currency manipulator, the U.S. Treasury says. And catch up on interesting developments in New Law, where tech considerations have outweighed having lawyers for one business, Atrium. Afternoon Coffee brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news.

Afternoon Coffee: It’s time to update Almanac for “50/50”; U.S.-China trade war analyzed; 737 Max grounding may hurt GDP

This year, the annual Spend Matters “50 Providers to Know” and “50 Providers to Watch” lists will be released April 22 at the SIG Procurement Technology Summit in Florida. To be considered for the lists, your company must have an up-to-date listing in the Spend Matters Almanac. Be sure to add or update your listing here by Feb. 7! In other news, the U.S.-China trade deal's phase one will be signed this week, and The Wall Street Journal takes a look back at the two years of tariffs and the fallout. And the Treasury secretary says the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max could hurt the GDP this year. Afternoon Coffee brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news.

Afternoon Coffee: U.S.-China deal advances; Brexit win; Qwil completes double financing round; Bill.com goes public

Two sagas concerning world trade — Brexit and a U.S.-China trade deal — saw major developments that give clarity to months of uncertainty. In other news: Qwil, a San Francisco-based startup that provides financing to freelancers and small businesses, has raised $24.4 million in equity and $200 million in debt funding, Reuters has reported. Bill.com has a strong IPO on day one, indicating that AP automation and payments are a hot area. Afternoon Coffee brings you the latest in procurement and supply chain news.

Brexit and U.S.-China trade deal gain steam

Global Risk Management Solutions (GRMS)

Two sagas concerning world trade — Brexit and a U.S.-China trade deal — saw major developments Thursday but are not done deals yet. The UK election yesterday strengthened Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who for years has favored a UK exit from the European Union. In the U.S. amid impeachment hearings over President Donald Trump, he has signaled that a preliminary deal on the 19-month-long U.S.-China trade has been reached, according to several news reports. The development could avert even more tariffs being imposed on goods from China that were to begin Sunday.

Commodities Roundup: Trump’s South America tariff threat; Saudi Aramco’s IPO; rising steel prices

For the buyers and category managers out there, especially those of you deep in the weeds of buying and managing commodities, here’s a quick rundown of news and thoughts from particular commodity markets. MetalMiner, a sister site of ours, scours the landscape for what matters. This week:

Afternoon Coffee: USMCA clears hurdle; WTO paralyzed; Tariff delay; new Upwork CEO; SAP partners with project44

U.S. House Democrats have worked out a USMCA trade deal with the White House that could lead to the NAFTA replacement moving forward. In other trade news, the WTO's Appellate Body, which acts as the highest court for international trade, will in effect be paralyzed by losing more panel members. Also, new U.S. tariffs against China could be delayed from taking effect Sunday, the WSJ reports. In contingent workforce news, Upwork names a new CEO. In logistics news, SAP today announced a partnership with project44, which provides visibility for shippers and service providers. And former Boeing manager Ed Pierson told NBC News that he had warned the company about problems at its main factory in Washington state, prior to two of its 737 MAX airplanes crashing in separate incidents that killed 350 people. Afternoon Coffee: Stay safe out there.

Commodities Roundup: Palladium soars; steel slides; auto tariffs loom over U.S.-E.U. trade talks

For the buyers and category managers out there, especially those of you deep in the weeds of buying and managing commodities, here’s a quick rundown of news and thoughts from particular commodity markets. MetalMiner, a sister site of ours, scours the landscape for what matters. This week:

Commodities Roundup: WTO rules on Airbus subsidies, GM strike drags on, steel prices decline

For the buyers and category managers out there, especially those of you deep in the weeds of buying and managing commodities, here’s a quick rundown of news and thoughts from particular commodity markets. MetalMiner, a sister site to Spend Matters, scours the landscape for what matters. This week:

Commodities Roundup: China’s steel production rises; U.S. seeks rare earths sources; gloomy copper forecast; September auto sales decline

For the buyers and category managers out there, especially those of you deep in the weeds of buying and managing commodities, here’s a quick rundown of news and thoughts from particular commodity markets. MetalMiner, a sister site of ours, scours the landscape for what matters. This week:

CIPS’ Bill Michels talks China trade, other global insights: ‘Brexit. What a headache!’

“The days of chasing low-cost labor around the globe, manufacturing in one location and shipping things around the globe are numbered,” said procurement veteran Bill Michels, VP of operations for the Americas at The Chartered Institute for Procurement and Supply (CIPS).

The U.S.-China trade war is the latest development in a trend away from overseas manufacturing, said Michels, who in part 2 of our Q&A also discusses automation, reshoring, protecting intellectual property, and the fallout of Brexit if the U.K. splits with the European Union at the end of this month.