Procurement Technology - Premium Content

Turbocharging E-invoicing Through the Supplier Network Value Proposition [Plus +]

e-invoicing

As we discussed in the first part of this e-invoicing research brief, there are many more goals of automating the invoicing (and invoice receiving) process than simply driving process efficiency. Indeed, advanced e-invoicing deployments now go far beyond the plumbing required to automate the issuance, workflow and approval of an invoice in a streamlined manner with as few accounts payable touch points as necessary (not to mention providing suppliers with greater visibility throughout the process). Today, supplier networks have emerged to extend the value proposition of basic e-invoicing to a number of new areas, including the better management of working capital (and much more). In the second part of this series, we discuss how supplier networks are extending the e-invoicing value proposition, advanced scenarios that e-invoicing and network providers are starting to enable today and who some of the key vendors in the space are, including specialists, suite providers and regional solutions.

AI in Optimization Today [PRO]

SciQuest

As we continue our investigation into AI in source-to-pay technology, which started with our AI in Procurement series and continued with our AI in Sourcing series, we take a deeper dive into optimization. Primarily the focus is on strategic sourcing decision optimization, but we'll discuss related areas as well.

First, let’s recap the status quo to remind us of the reason for the existence of these AI briefings.

AI, or artificial intelligence, does not yet exist, especially in the strictest definition of the term. Computers are not intelligent, not even artificially. They can do more calculations than ever before. They can take advantage of more data than ever before. They can find significantly more correlations than ever before and compute, with better and better statistical reliability, which are just correlations and which are true cause and effect relationships. But they are still, when you get right down to it, as dumb as door knobs. Probability is not intelligence. But it is damn good guidance.

In sourcing, logistics and supply chain, we are primarily concerned with decision optimization. Read on to find out the latest developments and expectations.

How E-Invoicing Extended Procurement’s Influence with Accounts Payable [Plus +]

e-invoicing

Editor's note: This is a refresh of our 2016 series on e-invoicing's influence on procurement-accounts payable relationships, which originally ran on Spend Matters PRO.

In this Spend Matters Plus research brief, we examine how procurement, through the use of technology, has extended its range of influence from its own processes to accounts payables and made electronic invoicing and supplier connectivity instrumental in the outcome of what we now call procure to pay (P2P). We also discuss the evolution of the purchasing function up to the integration of e-invoicing, the value proposition of e-invoicing, its challenges, what we see coming in the e-invoicing market and, finally, who some of the solution players are within the space.

Exploring ‘Total Cost’ as a Productivity KPI for the P2P Process [Plus +]

Total cost of ownership of the procure-to-pay process is not simply about measuring the costs associated with acquiring a P2P platform, it’s about tracking all P2P processes and managing them as a business key performance indicator. Managed well, the TCO P2P KPI can positively impact the bottom line of any business. Many organizations think that when acquiring a P2P platform, a firm business case needs to be constructed based on the total cost of the platform and high-level benefits that are reasonably achievable. But there’s actually a more effective way to think about the cost and returns of P2P technology. In this Spend Matters Plus brief, we explore this new way of measuring P2P returns and cost through a modified TCO approach.

Artificial Intelligence in Sourcing Tomorrow (Part 2) [PRO]

digital

In this Spend Matters PRO series on AI in Sourcing, we began our discussion of some situations where you will find AI in e-sourcing platforms, where AI is defined as “augmented intelligence” (because, as we have discussed in prior articles, there is no true artificial intelligence in enterprise platforms today and there won't be tomorrow either). AI is a buzzword, not a reality. But we don't need true AI to achieve software that can radically increase our productivity. Reaching augmented intelligence will add multiples to our productivity and savings.

In our last post, AI in Sourcing Tomorrow (Part 1), we discussed how the sourcing platforms of tomorrow will offer event-based category alignment functionality as well as market-based sourcing strategy identification. Together, these augmented intelligence features will not only save you a lot of time and effort in the identification and conducting of a proper sourcing event, but will also maximize your chances of success with the strategies that you follow.

It will be a magnificent start to the sourcing process. But it won't stop there. Because it can't stop there.

As per our article on AI in Sourcing Today, there's a lot of manual effort involved in a sourcing event. And the platforms of tomorrow will integrate workflow automation and auto-fill to handle a lot of the drudgery that will be required in any sourcing project.

However, just including workflow automation and auto-fill isn't getting you to sourcing utopia, where you’re getting maximum return for minimum effort. Something more is needed. How much more? Let's read on to find out.

Best Practices for Your P2P Implementation Project And How to Keep it From Becoming a Nightmare [Plus +]

complex sourcing

Editor's note: This is a refresh of our 2015 series on running a successful P2P implementation, which originally ran on Spend Matters PRO. Read Part 1 here.

In the Spend Matters webinar “Nightmare on Procurement Street,” we discuss how to successfully implement a procure-to-pay solution (P2P) and avoid the process from turning into a terrible experience. This 2-part Spend Matters Plus series lays out what tips we suggested for procurement organizations embarking on a P2P project. This is not meant to be an all-inclusive, step-by-step implementation guide, however. We simply want to share our best practice ideas based on our experience and our discussion in the webinar. Today, we will focus specifically on project management as a procurement responsibility, as well as ensuring finance and accounts payable (A/P) are included in the P2P implementation project. Other areas we will cover are remembering the importance of supplier integration, system testing and user training in the P2P process.

How to Succeed with Systems Integrators and Procurement Technology Implementation: Lessons From Spend Matters UK/Europe and Determine [PRO]

e-procurement

In too many cases, system integration (SI) and consultancy partnering decisions take a back seat to technology selection and related business process considerations when in fact all three areas are important to consider in equal measures as parts of source-to-pay and procure-to-pay deployments. This misstep is often one of the root causes of procurement organization dissatisfaction with technology decisions and adoption.

In this PRO brief, Jenny Draper, Spend Matters’ managing director for UK/Europe, shares her experience and best practices on the topic from serving as a procurement consultant over two decades before recently joining Spend Matters.

This best practice essay includes Jenny’s lessons learned on the importance of systems integration partners and how to set them up for success (and get the most out of a relationship). It covers such topics as when (and why) superior technologies fail, change management missteps, the role of the modern SI and finding the right fit partner. She then explores specific lessons learned from Determine’s boutique partner ecosystem in Europe.

Throughout, the brief also includes key takeaways and summary recommendations for procurement organizations going through procurement technology selections and deployments.

How to Keep Your P2P Implementation Project From Turning Into a Nightmare (Part 1) [Plus +]

Editor's note: This is a refresh of our 2015 series on running a successful P2P implementation, which originally ran on Spend Matters PRO.

In the webinar “Nightmare on Procurement Street,” we discussed best practices surrounding a procure-to-pay (P2P) implementation project. Webinar speakers were myself, Spend Matters Chief Research Officer Pierre Mitchell, GEP Worldwide Senior Manager Santosh Reddy and Senior Manager of Technology Product Marketing Paul Blake. This first of a multi-part Spend Matters PRO research brief will examine how to avoid a P2P implementation project from turning into your worst nightmare. While not an all-inclusive implementation guide, the brief points to some important steps that are necessary to conducting a successful P2P implementation.

AI in Procurement: The Day After Tomorrow [PRO]

SciQuest

Spend Matters has been exploring the state of artificial intelligence in procurement. Before we look into the future, let’s see where we’re at now. We started with AI in Procurement Today (Part 1 and Part 2), which was followed by AI in Procurement Tomorrow (Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3). This leads one to ask, what comes next? A number of vendors are already working on the tomorrow features and a few even have some in beta.

We aren't going to look too far into future because we want to stick to capabilities you should see in the next decade. So here’s a representative list of some of the more common features coming down the pipe. You should expect to see:

  • Tail spend elimination
  • Guided procurement
  • Performance improvement

AI in Procurement Tomorrow (Part 3): Category Wizards Will Save Time, Add Strategic Muscle [PRO]

In this series, Spend Matters delves into the status of artificial intelligence, with a focus on how AI can improve the sourcing and procuring process. Today the technology is really “assisted intelligence,” which was detailed in our precursor series: AI in Procurement Today, Part 1 and Part 2). The technology of tomorrow promises the “augmented intelligence” that we are discussing in this series, as some vendors already have limited beta capabilities. In the first two articles, we discussed how tomorrow's systems are going to help considerably with overspend protection and how "ninjabots" can crunch data on buying and automatic opportunity identification. In this article, we'll consider “category wizards” and how they can put a halt to manual tasks — like defining/assessing categories and choosing the best procurement process — thereby adding strategic prowess for even the lowest of buyers.

AI In Procurement Tomorrow (Part 2): Ninjabots and Augmented Intelligence [PRO]

In this series we are discussing artificial intelligence, with AI touted by many a salesperson. Virtually every vendor is claiming AI, even though it’s a stretch to promote having a fully functioning model. However, if you are willing to settle for “assisted intelligence,” that AI exists today (as per our precursor series that you can read here: AI in Procurement Today, Part 1 and Part 2), and it won't be long before we have the “augmented intelligence” that we are discussing in this series, as some vendors already have limited beta capabilities (that are typically restricted to a subset of categories) in many of these areas. In our last article, we discussed how tomorrow's systems are going to help considerably with overspend protection. In today's article, we'll consider “ninjabots” and dive into invisible buying, automatic buying and automatic opportunity identification.

AI in Procurement Tomorrow (Part 1): Recap and Overspend Prevention Examples [PRO]

As we highlighted in our earlier series on AI in Procurement Today (see Part 1 and Part 2), artificial intelligence is the buzzword — or, more precisely, the buzz acronym — du jour in procurement software. Virtually every vendor these days is either claiming to have AI or to be working on it, even if all the vendor has, or is working on, is robotic process automation (RPA).

Whether your vendor has AI or not, however, is not the most pressing question. Because AI is coming, possibly faster than you think. Moreover, if you don't adopt (at least the precursor) technology today, your procurement organization may be left in the dust tomorrow.