Down the Procurement Pub – Forget That, There’s a Referendum To Discuss

Here is our all-purpose post referendum article, written ahead of knowing the result of course!

Following a thrilling night of counting the votes from the referendum, it is clear now that the UK has voted to stay within the EU / leave the EU and plough our own course in the world.

The deciding factor was clearly the worries about the economy if we were to leave / the threat of unlimited immigration from Eastern European countries. This clearly won the day, convincing the mass of undecided voters who were worried about their jobs and pensions / their future life in a country overrun by Turks.

Prime Minister David Cameron is now the most relieved man in the country / finished as a major politician after the tense and sometimes acrimonious campaign. His job now is to try and re-unite a Conservative party facing internal warfare / get out of the way and let his successor oversee the exit from the EU.

We wish him well. Meanwhile, Boris Johnson and Michael Gove are struggling to resurrect their political careers / being carried shoulder high down Whitehall by the joyful hordes of Brexit supporters. Many other politicians are celebrating their choice of sides; others are bitterly regretting it.

Jeremy Corbyn will have mixed feelings – he clearly does not really believe in the EU, so he will be pleased he was on the winning side but perhaps secretly disappointed / disappointed he was on the losing side but perhaps secretly pleased by the decision.

So life goes on as normal / will change forever for the British people. And what about public procurement? Well, we certainly don’t see any great change in the short term.

One depressing thought though. Writing this before I know the result, and, moving out of light-hearted mode now, if we face problems over the next few years, whether they are economic, refugee crises, terrorism, or whatever, we have over 40% of the population who will blame the decision made yesterday. That does not feel like a recipe for a nation at ease with itself, and does worry us in terms of the future cohesion of the nation. Calling the referendum, whatever the result, may go down as Cameron’s biggest mistake.

Discuss this:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *