Procurement Recruitment Advice: Applying for New Roles

Continuing a timely series of recruitment advisory posts from Edbury Daley, specialist procurement recruiter.

The Christmas holidays and early January are traditionally times when people reflect on the previous year and begin to think about a potential job move. Recent research indicates that many people will use their new electronic devices to start looking for a job from Boxing Day onwards. If this applies to you then our series of articles in association with Spend Matters will be invaluable.

It’s going to be a competitive market, whether you are hiring the best available talent or trying to find an exciting new role.  We hope our advice will help you achieve your goals in 2015.

Applying for new roles

 

Many companies successfully hire procurement professionals directly. Often this is done via an in-house recruitment team who may approach you in much the same way as a third-party headhunter would. This may happen if they have found your details on a social networking platform or you have applied to the company in the past.

 

However, if you want to be a bit more proactive you may want to consider some direct approaches to desirable employers. This may be in the tried-and-tested format of simply applying to an advert. The majority of recruitment advertising is now online either on major generalist or industry specialist job boards. In addition, a number of companies advertise their vacancies on their own websites.

 

It is helpful to add a short covering email to your online application expressing some specific detail about why you are looking for a new position and why the position you are applying for is of interest. It is so much easier to apply for jobs online than by post so employers are often swamped with irrelevant applications. Make sure yours stands out from the masses.

 

You may have companies that you admire and would be interested in working for. If that is the case you could approach them directly even without an advertised vacancy. Typically you would need to try to identify a senior member of the HR or recruitment team and contact them to explain your interest and what skills and experience you have to offer. This is speculative by nature and so generates a low success rate, however, it may at least create a dialogue which leads to you be considered in the future for suitable jobs.

 

Often persistence is key when applying for a position directly. If you haven’t received a response to your CV then make contact by email or phone to ask for progress and any feedback. Even if you are not invited for interview you may learn something positive about another opportunity in the company or at least the reason why you weren’t successful.

 

You may also find Edbury Daley's recent analysis of the job market helpful in your decision making -- you can find it here

And if you have a few seconds to answer a short multiple-choice survey, you could help Edbury Daley  in its timely new research on recruitment choice and selection methods.

You can take part here 

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